Archive for the ‘News and Views’ Category

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August Ushers 59 New Titles… The Mr. Magazine™ Launch Monitor.

September 3, 2015

From the latest trend in stress relief for adults: coloring books, to the controversial world of marijuana commercial growing and selling; the month of August was filled with titles that continue to reflect the face of our society more than any other medium in the industry.

Arts & Crafts were big this time around and eating well remained important as the kaleidoscope of covers below will show as you give them a look – 59 new titles in all – 20 with promised frequency…it was truly another healthy month for magazines…

Chart 1 below compares the numbers of August 2015 to those of August 2014 and Chart 2 compares the categories of new magazines of August 2015 to those of August 2014.

Chart 1: New Magazines August 2015 vs. August 2014
August 2015 v 2014 pie graph

Chart 2: New Magazine Categories August 2015 vs. August 2014
August 2015 v 2014 top categories

And now for the covers of each and every new launch from August 2015.

**You will notice two Time Specials that are both “Marijuana Goes Main Street,” both covers were included for your viewing, but only count as one magazine…

Up first our frequency covers:

Artenol-21 Biz Peake-5 Cabin Living-19 Calming Art-1 Color Calm-4 Coloring Heaven-2 Coloring Meditation-3 Craft Girl-17 Drones-6 Eating Naturally-10 Faces-14 Gunslingers-18 MG-11 Natural Modern-8 Pain-Free Living-7 Relax with Art-16 Shutter-1 Simply Moderne-9 Take-13 The History of Rock-12

And now our August Specials:

21-Day Yoga Challenge-1 2015 Baseball Hall of Fame-12 All Time Best Make Ahead Recipes-29 All-time Best Recipes-30 American Girl Everyday Fun-9 Attitude Era-10 Coloring is a form of happiness-5 Cottage Counrty-9 Cottage Kitchens-8 Diabetic Desserts-16 Electric Car Insider-10 Elle Style Essentials-2 Felted-17 Forbes The Smarter College Guide-3 From Scraps to Sensational-3 Guide to the Night Sky-26 Haunted Mysteries and Legends-4 Health-20 History's Greatest Conspiracy Theories-28 Kool Kars & Hot Honeys-6 Led Zeppelin-15 Mixed Media Jewelry-19 Movie Reunions-7 Organize your Stuff-13 Pope Francis 2-23 Pope Francis in America-22 Pope Francis-5 Roddy Piper-7 Small Homes-27 The Bible Why It Matters Today-6 The Caitlyn Jenner Story-24 The New Story of the Holy Land-21 The Queen-18 TIME Marijuana Goes Main Street Cover 2-14 TIME Marijuana Goes Main Street-2 Trends-25 Ultimate Book of Bugs-4 Vanished-8 Vanity Fair Special Edition-2 Weapons of WWII-11

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Keith Bellows: A Traveler Arrives At His Final Destination…

September 1, 2015

Listening to Keith Bellows’ presentation as he spoke at the ACT 5 Experience last year on October 8, one could hear in his speech that Keith was talking about his journey, his future, his final travel trip and his final destination. I have known and worked with Keith since he was an editor at Whittle Communications in Knoxville, TN. We became good friends and we continued that relationship while he was at the helm of National Geographic Traveler.

Keith and I spoke few weeks ago. He was still looking forward to the future, to new ventures. He was upbeat and determined to beat the illness that took a toll on him. Little did he, or I, know that he was going to take his final journey way too soon. This is the first journey that Keith is not going to report on or even write an article about. Rest in peace Keith Bellows and thanks for the memories and works that you’ve left behind. They will help all those who knew you to continue the journey and remember you one memory at a time.

Watch Keith Bellow’s presentation at the ACT 5 Experience at the Magazine Innovation Center @ The University of Mississippi, Oct. 8, 2014. Click below to watch his presentation.

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Modern Farmer: A Movement In A Magazine. Live The Experience Of What We Eat & How We Live – The Mr. Magazine™ Interview With Editor-in-Chief, Sarah Gray Miller.

August 31, 2015

“I’m such a firm believer in print. I think one big mistake magazines make is they start looking to cut corners and they denigrate the actual physical print product and in this case Modern Farmer is a luxury item with a high cover price and the actual object looks and feels luxurious. And at the end of the day, the print is the legitimizer of everything that flows from it. Yes, we have a great website; we have a fantastic digital director running it and we’re all over social media, but the print is the true legitimizer and the hub from which everything else flows. And there’s just no substitute for sitting down with a magazine and a glass of wine or a cup of coffee, whatever your poison is, and flipping through it.” Sarah Gray Miller

modern farmer news Modern Farmer magazine celebrates mother earth and all of her mysteries. From what we eat, how it’s grown and what repercussions we might expect from the way we interact with our planet, to the subtlety of earth’s mission to sustain and keep us healthy. The magazine is a plethora of information that is both timely and valuable to the human species.

The magazine relaunched with the summer issue and while most things haven’t changed, the quality and aesthetic value of the magazine to name two; some things did, such as providing more service to the reader and a heavier, more substantial well of content.

The new editor in chief, Sarah Gray Miller, is a woman who knows quite a bit about the earth beneath her feet in her own right, having spent most of her career working for publications that revere it. Since January 2015, she has been at the helm of Modern Farmer and is passionately thrilled with the magazine’s interestingly hybrid nature.

I spoke with Sarah Gray recently and we talked about that fact, and how the magazine appeals to not only the most experienced of farmers and gardeners, but the backyard enthusiast as well. It was a fun and entertaining conversation and one I think you will highly enjoy.

So, sit back and get ready to do some “Modern” farming, without getting your hands dirty at all…

But first, the sound-bites:

sarahgraymiller
On the fact the magazine first-launched with much fanfare, then was relaunched recently under her leadership:
It’s hard for me to tell you much about what happened before I got here because I wasn’t around. So, I don’t know exactly what went down. What I can tell you is that I’m very lucky in that I came onboard at a really strong brand that caught an amazing wave in the culture and that was right on time, maybe even slightly ahead of its time because I feel like we’re getting even more traction now.

On the magnetic attraction she seems to have for magazines that deal with food, gardening and the country living-type experience: I’ve long been interested in food and the growing of food and lifestyles, so Modern Farmer is the perfect fit for me. Also, I love the fact that it is located in the Hudson Valley in Athens, New York. I’ve had a house up here for nine years now and for the longest time I was relegated to being just a weekender, and sort of dreaded going back to the city on Sunday nights.

On her goals for Modern Farmer and what direction she envisions for the magazine: I might start with the things that I’ve decided not to change. One is the look of the magazine. The production values are amazing. We have incredibly good paper and that we’re keeping. The design is gorgeous; the cover identity remains the same. I do think though that throughout the magazine there is a little more service; a little more in depth reporting. Every time we cover something we ask ourselves the really hard questions such as: why does this belong in Modern Farmer and nowhere else? And these questions are just something that the reader asks too.

On what she thinks the major determinate is for Modern Farmer to survive:
I do think it’s catching this wave in the culture where people care very much about that their food; I think that’s key. Even before advertising, keeping your readers happy and satisfying your consumers and your audience is vital. And I’ve long- edited from the reader’s point-of-view, with a pretty sharp BS meter for whether or not I as the reader understand it and I’m spurred to action, have the tools I need to take that action, etc. And then of course, advertising is part of the equation.

On whether she thinks a magazine called “Modern” Farmer can be successful in print:
I’m such a firm believer in print. I think one big mistake magazines make is they start looking to cut corners and they denigrate the actual physical print product and in this case Modern Farmer is a luxury item with a high cover price and the actual object looks and feels luxurious. And at the end of the day, the print is the legitimizer of everything that flows from it.

On whether her past career experience at places such as Garden Design and Country Living helped to prepare her for her job at Modern Farmer: Immeasurably. I owe the biggest debt to Dorothy Kalins at Garden Design who taught me pretty much everything I know and also the connections I made there and at Organic Style and Country Living were incredibly helpful.

On the challenges of doing cover photo shoots with animals versus people:
Oh, the things that I’ve learned about ducks that you wouldn’t believe. One thing and we laugh here, animals look like what animals look like, so there’s not a whole lot of photoshopping you can do in the same way as you can with celebrities and real people, so that’s different. They bring their own set of challenges however.

On what motivates her to get out of bed in the mornings:
I am so energized by this product that I just can’t tell you how much. There are two different things; one, I love a startup; I love a turnaround and I love indie journalism more than anything, so the fact that this is young and scrappy and a tiny team reminds me of what it was like at Garden Design, Budget Living and Saveur. I do not spend my days in corporate meetings; I’m actually back doing the work again. I’m getting to report things and write things and line edit content, which is thrilling and fun and exciting. It’s a bit of a rollercoaster.

On how her role as editor has changed from before the digital age and after:
I think all editors are busier now than they used to be for sure, because you’re looking at multiple channels, but at the end of the day it’s all about communicating information to your audience, whether you’re doing that on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, or your website or in print. I really welcome the technology. I also love that it allows for more immediacy and more of a conversation and an exchange with the reader.

On how she decides on the animal that will grace the cover of the magazine each time: For one, we’re not covering animals that have already been covered, that’s a big part of it. And then it’s also looking at, this may sound silly, but with animals, just like fashion or food, there are definite trends. There is a ton of interest in duck eggs and duck meat; they’re the new chickens, if you will.

On whom she sees as Modern Farmer’s number one competitor: I don’t really see one out there. I know every editor likes to say that, but I don’t. It would have been easier for me, at say, Country Living, to name magazines that seemed like they were in a competitive set, but here the magazine is such an interesting hybrid; it’s covering food, gardening, farming and just the whole back-to-the-land lifestyle and it also contains the kind of articles that put it in more of a thought leader category, or a hard journalism category.

On anything else she’d like to add:
One question that I get a lot is: are we for farmers? And are farmers reading the magazine? And the answer is yes, we do have farmers reading us. And we do want to speak to those farmers and cover tools that will help them and cover plants that relate to farming, but we also have a lot of people who read the magazine who are merely backyard gardeners; who are want-to-be farmer-gardeners and dreamers and concerned, responsible consumers. So, we are talking to all of those constituents at the same time, which is challenging but incredibly rewarding.

On what keeps her up at night:
Everything keeps me up at night. (Laughs) Everything from the state of the plants, the pictures; did I put the wrong directional on that caption, just everything. You would think right after we go to press that I would have the calmest, most relaxed time, especially with a quarterly; that I would get a few really calm weeks. But that’s when I wake up in the middle of the night the most wondering did I catch everything; did I get everything right.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ conversation with Sarah Gray Miller, Editor-In-Chief, Modern Farmer magazine.

Samir Husni: Modern Farmer was born with a big bang and it was the darling of the media and then something happened and now you’re in charge. Tell me about that journey.

Sarah Gray Miller: It’s hard for me to tell you much about what happened before I got here because I wasn’t around. So, I don’t know exactly what went down. What I can tell you is that I’m very lucky in that I came onboard at a really strong brand that caught an amazing wave in the culture and that was right on time, maybe even slightly ahead of its time because I feel like we’re getting even more traction now.

All of that said, everything can be improved, so the first thing that I did when I got here was to really try and elicit criticism; I wanted to hear from readers and people in the business about what they didn’t love; what they wanted to see changed, as well as what they did love and what the sacred cows were. The last thing I wanted to do was to throw the baby out with the bath water.

Samir Husni: This genre of magazines seems to attract you like a magnet; you’ve been with Country Living, Organic Style and Garden Design…

Sarah Gray Miller: I’ve long been interested in food and the growing of food and lifestyles, so Modern Farmer is the perfect fit for me. Also, I love the fact that it is located in the Hudson Valley in Athens, New York. I’ve had a house up here for nine years now and for the longest time I was relegated to being just a weekender, and sort of dreaded going back to the city on Sunday nights. So, to be able to live here full time and be in the media business is amazingly fortunate.

Samir Husni: Tell me about your plans and goals for Modern Farmer and where you expect to take the magazine now that it’s under your tenure.

modern farmer sub Sarah Gray Miller: I might start with the things that I’ve decided not to change. One is the look of the magazine. The production values are amazing. We have incredibly good paper and that we’re keeping. The design is gorgeous; the cover identity remains the same.

I do think though that throughout the magazine there is a little more service; a little more in depth reporting. Every time we cover something we ask ourselves the really hard questions such as: why does this belong in Modern Farmer and nowhere else? And these questions are just something that the reader asks too.

The cover animal; they wanted to know more and see more in depth coverage on that particular animal. So, instead of just a rundown of eight cute breeds, we’re actually telling people about how to go about raising ducks.

The magazine is ultimately for people who care greatly about their food and where it comes from and in the past you never saw a lot of food. And you may have noticed in the fall issue there is food and recipes connected to chefs and the causes that they’re advocating for. But I think it’s important to actually see food.

Samir Husni: You’ve been doing this for some time and you’ve seen a lot of magazines come and go; what do you think is the major determinate for Modern Farmer to survive?

Sarah Gray Miller: I do think it’s catching this wave in the culture where people care very much about that their food; I think that’s key. Even before advertising, keeping your readers happy and satisfying your consumers and your audience is vital. And I’ve long- edited from the reader’s point-of-view, with a pretty sharp BS meter for whether or not I as the reader understand it and I’m spurred to action, have the tools I need to take that action, etc. And then of course, advertising is part of the equation.

So, shortly after I came onboard, which was the very end of January 2015; we brought in a publisher and there’s an ad sales staff, that way I get to focus on making the magazine, which is great, and speaking to the readers. But there’s now a dedicated team out selling it to advertisers.

Samir Husni: What do you say to those people who might ask you; the name of the magazine is Modern Farmer, yet you’re publishing a print magazine, an ink on paper magazine, in these modern digital days; what would you say to them?

Sarah Gray Miller: I’m such a firm believer in print. I think one big mistake magazines make is they start looking to cut corners and they denigrate the actual physical print product and in this case Modern Farmer is a luxury item with a high cover price and the actual object looks and feels luxurious. And at the end of the day, the print is the legitimizer of everything that flows from it.

Yes, we have a great website; we have a fantastic digital director running it and we’re all over social media, but the print is the true legitimizer and the hub from which everything else flows. And there’s just no substitute for sitting down with a magazine and a glass of wine or a cup of coffee, whatever your poison is, and flipping through it.

Samir Husni: Needless to say, I agree with you 100%. (Laughs)

Sarah Gray Miller: (Laughs too). For obvious reasons, Mr. Magazine™.

Samir Husni: With your background; you’re from Mississippi, so you grew up in a farming state and you’ve worked with all of these magazines that have to do with food, farming as a way of life, and getting back to Mother Earth. How do you think all of that has helped and prepared you for the job you’re doing now?

Sarah Gray Miller: Immeasurably. I owe the biggest debt to Dorothy Kalins at Garden Design who taught me pretty much everything I know and also the connections I made there and at Organic Style and Country Living were incredibly helpful.

Another thing that I learned, probably at Garden Design, where you’re dealing with sort of technical, horticultural information is the ability to speak to the expert, the pro, the experienced person who’s been doing it forever and at the very same time talk to the enthusiast who might be new to the subject matter. And there’s a real trick for not talking down to people who already know what they’re doing, but giving the enthusiast context clues to understand the material.

Samir Husni: When you’re shooting your covers of all of the different animals, such as the duck on the summer issue; how difficult is it working with animals as opposed to working with celebrities and other people that you can actually talk to?

Sarah Gray Miller: (Laughs) Oh, the things that I’ve learned about ducks that you wouldn’t believe. One thing and we laugh here, animals look like what animals look like, so there’s not a whole lot of photoshopping you can do in the same way as you can with celebrities and real people, so that’s different. They bring their own set of challenges however.

Luckily with the duck they’re flightless, but they also have notoriously filthy bathroom habits. I tried to say that in the most polite way possible, but I’ll just put it this way; we went through a lot of white seamless paper onset during that shoot.

Samir Husni: What makes you tick and click and motivates you to get out of bed in the mornings and say it’s going to be a great day?

Sarah Gray Miller: I am so energized by this product that I just can’t tell you how much. There are two different things; one, I love a startup; I love a turnaround and I love Indie journalism more than anything, so the fact that this is young and scrappy and a tiny team reminds me of what it was like at Garden Design, Budget Living and Saveur. I do not spend my days in corporate meetings; I’m actually back doing the work again. I’m getting to report things and write things and line edit content, which is thrilling and fun and exciting. It’s a bit of a rollercoaster.

I also think this magazine has the potential to, and this may sound hyperbolic, change the world. This magazine is a force for good, which makes me proud to be a part of it and I get very excited and passionate about the stories that we do.

And we get to do long-form journalism, which is so rare. We’re assigning pieces that are 2,000 words long and very few magazine editors get to do that. And we get to cover important political issues. It’s smarter than your average lifestyle magazine.

Samir Husni: You were editing magazines before the dawn of the digital age…

Sarah Gray Miller: Yes, I think we were on AOL way back 20 years ago when email was brand new. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: You were editing before we became fully digitized and after; how has your role of editor changed during those years?

Sarah Gray Miller: I think all editors are busier now than they used to be for sure, because you’re looking at multiple channels, but at the end of the day it’s all about communicating information to your audience, whether you’re doing that on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, or your website or in print. I really welcome the technology. I also love that it allows for more immediacy and more of a conversation and an exchange with the reader.

I always said that I’ve never been nor ever will be one of those editors who sit above the reader. I always like to get down on the floor and roll around with them. I’m in it with them. And I think social media, especially, allows us to have such a conversation with our audience. And get instantaneous feedback about what interests them or doesn’t interest them.

And then what the print product lets us do is take our time and sink our teeth into a subject, report it from every angle, lovingly line edit, making sure every single word is right, and create a gloriously deep, physical, luxurious product. But I also like the fast interaction that digital media provides. I consume information on all channels.

Samir Husni: When you’re considering your next cover subject; how do you decide which animal is up next?

Sarah Gray Miller: For one, we’re not covering animals that have already been covered, that’s a big part of it. And then it’s also looking at, this may sound silly, but with animals, just like fashion or food, there are definite trends. There is a ton of interest in duck eggs and duck meat; they’re the new chickens, if you will.

That same thinking went into our fall issue, where we’ve got a cover contest up online still, so I can’t tell you what it is yet, but it’s an animal that has sort of went through a boom-bust economy. And it’s back and people are farming it again.

There’s also a now-ness; we’re not just covering X because it’s summer and that’s the time to cover this particular animal or that one. We’re also thinking about what people are interested in right then.

Samir Husni: Who do you consider your number one competitor?

Sarah Gray Miller: I don’t really see one out there. I know every editor likes to say that, but I don’t. It would have been easier for me, at say, Country Living, to name magazines that seemed like they were in a competitive set, but here the magazine is such an interesting hybrid; it’s covering food, gardening, farming and just the whole back-to-the-land lifestyle and it also contains the kind of articles that put it in more of a thought leader category, or a hard journalism category. So, I don’t see a direct competitor.

Samir Husni: Is there anything else that you’d like to add?

Sarah Gray Miller: One question that I get a lot is: are we for farmers? And are farmers reading the magazine? And the answer is yes, we do have farmers reading us. And we do want to speak to those farmers and cover tools that will help them and cover plants that relate to farming, but we also have a lot of people who read the magazine who are merely backyard gardeners; who are want-to-be farmer-gardeners and dreamers and concerned, responsible consumers. So, we are talking to all of those constituents at the same time, which is challenging but incredibly rewarding.

And I don’t know why it throws people, because Rolling Stone has people who are not rock stars who read the magazine. Farmers are the rock stars for this audience.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Sarah Gray Miller: Everything keeps me up at night. (Laughs) Everything from the state of the plants, the pictures; did I put the wrong directional on that caption, just everything. You would think right after we go to press that I would have the calmest, most relaxed time, especially with a quarterly; that I would get a few really calm weeks. But that’s when I wake up in the middle of the night the most wondering did I catch everything; did I get everything right. I take this job really seriously and I feel very responsible to the people who pay for the magazine and read it. It matters to me greatly that we get everything not just right, but great.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

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When It Comes To Content It’s All About “The Reader” – Innovation Through Environmentally-Responsible & Moral Journalism – The Mr. Magazine™ Interview With Chris Theodore, Co-Founder, Editor, The Reader Magazine.

August 28, 2015

“The Reader is a publication that’s education-focused, free, and really revolutionizes standard direct mail by focusing on good content and the power of what paper and print can do. And what we find quite interesting and fascinating is that the direct mail industry has really been missing the opportunity that print and stories present. And what we do in The Reader magazine is we revive those values that are inherent in an IT (Information Technology), and we call print an IT that is underappreciated, but also extremely widely-used and understood.” Chris Theodore

PastCoverofReaderMagazine3 The power of print has never been more evident than with The Reader Magazine. Co-founder and editor, Chris Theodore is a soft-spoken man who has the heart of a lion when it comes to the mission of his magazine.

The Reader is a free news publication founded in 2001 and its mission is to help advertisers influence local audiences through positive environmental, social and economic impact in communities. Through moral integrity, social responsibility and a genuine desire to change people’s lives, The Reader is a journalistic endeavor that has definitely made its mark in the world of magazines and magazine media.

I spoke with Chris recently and we talked about the magazine’s noble foundation and purpose and about the goal of expansion which will happen in three phases over the next five years. The goal – to become the first single media entity with a journalistic connection with every American, to create a Reader Nation.

A lofty goal, some might say, but nevertheless, their ultimate dream of providing print and Internet advertising to all U.S. advertisers, would change the face of advertising immeasurably.

The environmentally-responsible business model that it implements is done with the primary goal of saving each advertiser an average of 4 tons of wood per year by driving advertiser ROI through journalistic content rather than high frequency, which in turn is a monetary amount of over $3,500 per year.

It’s a remarkable magazine with a remarkable man behind the wheel. The passion and enthusiasm that Chris feels for both the brand and the cause is palpable.

So, I hope you enjoy being “The Reader” of this interview with Chris Theodore, Co-founder and Editor, The Reader Magazine… I know I thoroughly did.

But first, the sound-bites:

NobleMediaCEOChrisTheodore
On a description of what The Reader is:
It’s a publication that’s education-focused, free, and really revolutionizes standard direct mail by focusing on good content and the power of what paper and print can do.

On why he believes some magazine publishers have missed the boat on the power of print:
Certainly some people have not missed the boat. Let’s talk about The Economist, which I heard was just up for sale. I read that they were doing something like $500 million in sales and $95 million in profit. I don’t know that company well enough to tell you what part of that revenue is print-driven, but I bet a big part of it is. (Laughs) Probably 80% of it is. So, clearly there are companies who understand that power and are just going right after it, or aren’t trying to hide what they do.

On The Reader’s approach with advertisers when it comes to its environmentally-responsible business model concerning the magazine versus direct mail:
It was research that we undertook about two or three years ago that we’re really glad that we focused on. It came about through relationships with third-party, non-profit organizations that were more than glad to help us determine that. It was really super-cool to be able to give people this sensible, accurate and scientific peer review in a type of analysis, which was awesome. Does it matter to our advertisers? I think to some, yes. I haven’t done research as to the impact our environmentally-responsible model has on our advertisers, but I can tell you that it’s clear when we’re discussing advertising that it is increasingly a positive thing when we’re talking to potential advertisers.

On whether he thinks The Reader is more of an advocate magazine or a journalistic magazine:
One of the most powerful things that we do, and I can feel the goose bumps forming on my arm as I’m telling you, is the fact that we use our magazine in a moral way. We try to find information that can communicate in a moral way. Does that mean advocacy? I wouldn’t use the word advocacy; you might call it solution-focused journalism. Some people call it explanatory journalism.

On whether he believes the magazine could have accomplished its goal and vision without the print component, if it were digital-only: That’s an interesting question. I don’t know the answer to that. We certainly could never do what we’re intending to do, nor would we have the impact in a local community if we were just digital, because there are just too many choices out there. What’s interesting about print is that – well, there are many things interesting about print as you well know, but I would say that one of them is the power to be in someone’s home and to have something tangible. That’s very important.

On the fact that he and The Reader hit the spotlight when he asked the Governor of California for $26 million to hire 439 laid-off PennySaver employees and whether he received the money: No, we haven’t gotten the money yet. (Laughs too) It remains to be seen where that money will come from. It’s important to be patient and our company’s strategy is sure-footed; we’ve always been sure-footed. Things are still in a positive state in terms of potentially working and getting this money from the state of California.

On the expansion plans for The Reader:
When I thought about doing what we’re doing in this area, Southern California, at the very beginning my dream was to just do this area. Then that dream and my desire grew. Even in 2006, believe it or not, we were dreaming about expanding into greater areas, but we really hadn’t put together the plan. We’d done a lot of hard work, but we hadn’t done what can be the excruciatingly hard work of doing all of the financial analysis and all of the operational and strategical analyses and all of the research, that we have now done. So, that has resulted in what is about an 87-page business planning process paper that shows specifically every state, including Mississippi, and when we will create a zone in that area.

On the major stumbling block he might face and how he would overcome it:
The key will be talent; attracting and hiring, managing, inspiring and retaining talent. Our plan for addressing that will be what I eluded to earlier, which is we will keep our focus on the noble purpose of what we’re doing. And we will make sure that those who come aboard understand that this is not just about profitability, it’s about bringing something needed and that can transform hearts and individual’s lives into their homes that they wouldn’t have otherwise.

On anything else he’d like to add:
Blowing the lid off just a little more about the myth of advertising expenditures is something I find interesting and one of my favorites is, according to Ad Age magazine as well as BIA/Kelsey, a local advertising research company, of the $140 billion spent on local advertising last year, 50% was spent on some form of print advertising, 27% of the $140 billion was spent on direct mail. But the most fascinating, I think, is how that shows people what’s happening with print and local advertising. It is $70 billion that is spent on print and that’s not talking about national advertising. That’s local advertising.

On what keeps him up at night:
There’s really not one thing in particular. There’s not one thing that really keeps me up at night, because right now to be honest with you, my feeling is that it’s time to move. There are various times in life that we do things and that we want things, but right now it’s time to simply put it altogether and to move forward.

And now for the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ conversation with Chris Theodore, Co-Founder, Editor, The Reader Magazine.

Samir Husni: Could you tell me a little about The Reader?

Chris Theodore: It’s a publication that’s education-focused, free, and really revolutionizes standard direct mail by focusing on good content and the power of what paper and print can do.

And what we find quite interesting and fascinating is that the direct mail industry has really been missing the opportunity that print and stories present. And what we do in The Reader magazine is we revive those values that are inherent in an IT (Information Technology), and we call print an IT that is underappreciated, but also extremely widely-used and understood.

And why its understanding is important and why its familiarity is actually important is because that’s the door that opens when you start talking about print to actual lay people or businesspeople. And when you’re describing the power of print to businesspeople, it’s not a story that you have to try very hard to get people to understand, which is very important because that way you can sell advertising. So, there is a huge door opening there, which paves the way for a relationship with a businessperson. And that would be one way to describe The Reader magazine.

Samir Husni: Why do you think a lot of other publishers and magazine publishers have missed or ignored that story and now people are calling it content marketing or native advertising, rather than using the power of print to deliver stories plus advertising? Why have they missed the boat on this?

Chris Theodore: Certainly some people have not missed the boat. There’s a great website that I found recently called “The Power of Print,” I’m not really quite sure what they’re doing, but they are people who obviously love print.

But let me try and hit your question straight-on. I would say actually that there are plenty of publishers out there who understand it and that they’re doing well and their business model is doing well.

Let’s talk about The Economist, which I heard was just up for sale. I read that they were doing something like $500 million in sales and $95 million in profit. I don’t know that company well enough to tell you what part of that revenue is print-driven, but I bet a big part of it is. (Laughs) Probably 80% of it is. So, clearly there are companies who understand that power and are just going right after it, or aren’t trying to hide what they do.

Interestingly on the other hand, there are companies here in California that are calling their companies digital first rather than what they are which is a media channel, which I find really quite interesting. They’re supposed to be a local media channel. And I think some of is bad information.

Samir Husni: I refer to that as falling in love with the first gorgeous mistress who walks the hallways of those companies, tempting them with the revenues of digital, while our faithful partner called print has been and still is providing us with our daily bread.

Chris Theodore: You’re right and has been for a long, long time.

Samir Husni: Let me ask you specifically about The Reader because I was fascinated in the way that you said: you use The Reader to advertise instead of high-frequency junk mail or direct mail. And the amount of savings in terms of trees and water; tell me more about that concept and as you go and approach your clients, your advertisers, and you compare direct mail to The Reader as the vehicle of delivery for their advertisements; tell me about that conversation.

Chris Theodore: Yes, of course. It was research that we undertook about two or three years ago that we’re really glad that we focused on. It came about through relationships with third-party, non-profit organizations that were more than glad to help us determine that. It was really super-cool to be able to give people this sensible, accurate and scientific peer review in a type of analysis, which was awesome.

Does it matter to our advertisers? I think to some, yes. I haven’t done research as to the impact our environmentally-responsible model has on our advertisers, but I can tell you that it’s clear when we’re discussing advertising that it is increasingly a positive thing when we’re talking to potential advertisers.

I think that also corresponds to the amount of people in the United States who increasingly care about lowering fossil-fuel burning, which is interesting because our next issue is on the environmental politics in California. And one of the things I’m learning is there are some things that, not just Californians, but all Americans think about in terms of the environment, or let me say not all, but a high majority, and one of them is lowering fossil-fuel use. So, it’s really been a timely thing.

I think one of the things we’re good at is timing, in terms of our publication. In business it’s always helpful to be that. The environmental impact is something that’s important, particularly in California where we’re having a drought, for our advertisers to know and for our audiences to know. And that each of our advertisers is saving a community 40,000 gallons of water a year. From an advertisement standpoint, that’s about the size of two business cards, if I’m not mistaken. And that’s something that matters to them. Then we can figure it all out, there’s all kinds of cool calculators online; we can figure out what 40,000 gallons equals for a community, let’s say with 120,000 households. So, it’s a cool time.

I love being in the magazine business right now for many reasons. One of them is having access to great information that we can provide people simultaneously and generally in my opinion; it’s a quality level of educationally-focused information that is presented in ways that do not alienate or do not pander. There’s a need for that, despite the incredible amount of information everywhere. There is still a need for good content.

Samir Husni: Is The Reader more of an advocate magazine or more of a journalistic magazine?

PastCoverofReaderMagazine2 Chris Theodore: That’s a great question. I’ll answer it this way; my colleague and the co-founder of The Reader magazine, sent me a wonderful article yesterday that was in Forbes. And it was about how some companies, and they were using Monster.com as an example, tail spun and fell apart because they lost their sense of noble purpose. They were talking about how originally Monster.com was saying that they wanted people to have a job that they cared about and something that they could feel good about. The whole focus was on making sure that the users used that medium in order to do something very important in their lives, which was to find something with meaning. And they lost that. When it was all profit-driven and the CEO, who was subsequently fired, was all about the quarterly and focusing on it, they lost that sense of noble purpose.

I bring that up because one of the most powerful things that we do, and I can feel the goose bumps forming on my arm as I’m telling you, is the fact that we use our magazine in a moral way. We try to find information that can communicate in a moral way. Does that mean advocacy? I wouldn’t use the word advocacy; you might call it solution-focused journalism. Some people call it explanatory journalism.

I would say that one of the things missing today is a certain moral quality when it comes to journalism and the information being shared with people. And you might be able to sense why this would be so important; if you have a free publication and you can actually master a certain moral tone without being over-the-top or coming across as: this is the only way, but rather basing your information on a basis of truth, something like what The Center for Public Integrity does, where you can tell after a while, if you’ve been following their journalistic brand, after some years, but it doesn’t really take years. You can actually pick it up the first time you ever see it. There’s a certain truthfulness and a certain avoidance of the same kind of language that gets people into problems.

George Orwell once said that when he wrote an article, he used to be a journalist; he tried to not use words or expressions that were simply the repetition of what others had said. So, if you just try hard enough you can create a certain moral brand, if you will, that actually is legitimate and relevant.

Samir Husni: And do you think you could have accomplished what you have with The Reader without the print component, if you were digital-only?

Chris Theodore: That’s an interesting question. I don’t know the answer to that. We certainly could never do what we’re intending to do, nor would we have the impact in a local community if we were just digital, because there are just too many choices out there.

What’s interesting about print is that – well, there are many things interesting about print as you well know, but I would say that one of them is the power to be in someone’s home and to have something tangible. That’s very important.

So, I guess one of the answers to your question is that I don’t envision that. We wouldn’t have been able to achieve what we’re achieving and what we wanted to achieve any other way than through print.

Samir Husni: Back in May you and The Reader came into the spotlight when you asked Governor Brown to give you a grant or a loan of $26 million to hire 439 Californians who were laid off when PennySaver closed its doors, a media company which had been operating for 50 years. Any reaction from anyone? Did you get the money? (Laughs)

Chris Theodore: No, we haven’t gotten the money yet. (Laughs too) It remains to be seen where that money will come from. It’s important to be patient and our company’s strategy is sure-footed; we’ve always been sure-footed. Things are still in a positive state in terms of potentially working and getting this money from the state of California.

But also it very well might not come from the state, but instead come from the Money Markets and the private sector, commercial sources, basically.

Samir Husni: The Reader is doing well in the local market; it’s my understanding that advertising revenue was something like 46% higher this year than last. Is that the encouraging sign that is pushing you to go nationwide, to expand? Or is it the mission that you want to share with the rest of the country after sharing it with California for 15 years?

Chris Theodore: It’s both. That’s the short answer and I’ve given so few short answers that’ll I’ll keep it at that.

Samir Husni: Tell me about the expansion plans; when could I expect to see, for example, The Reader delivered to my home in Mississippi?

Environmental Impact of Reader Vs. PennySaver copy Chris Theodore: The expansion plan really grew out of a long, simmering desire to have a bigger impact than we had and to be able to bring the kind of information that I’ve described to more people. It came from a desire to share with people who might not have had the same kind of background that I did, which was a father who was an educator and a mother who was involved in non-profit work, so I was given a lot in my very fortunate upbringing. So that changed my trajectory.

When I thought about doing what we’re doing in this area, Southern California, at the very beginning my dream was to just do this area. Then that dream and my desire grew. Even in 2006, believe it or not, we were dreaming about expanding into greater areas, but we really hadn’t put together the plan. We’d done a lot of hard work, but we hadn’t done what can be the excruciatingly hard work of doing all of the financial analysis and all of the operational and strategical analyses and all of the research, that we have now done.

So, that has resulted in what is about an 87-page business planning process paper that shows specifically every state, including Mississippi, and when we will create a zone in that area.

The short story is that the expansion will occur in three phases. The planning is somewhat flexible and I’m proud of our planning for that reason. In California, for example, when PennySaver closed, our plan was flexible enough and we knew the numbers enough that we could very quickly figure out what we would need in terms of upfront capital as well as anything else to change it somewhat so that we could accelerate the expansion and go into California, for example, on a faster way than we had.

But the short story is it will occur in three phases over five years and everything has been laid out, not that things won’t come up, things will come up and problems will occur, but I have a very good understanding of this business; I have a very good understanding of this market and we feel that if we do what we have done up to now, which is being careful and making good decisions and having good people, eventually we will be nationwide in about five years.

Samir Husni: What do you anticipate during those five years as being your major stumbling block and what is your contingency plan to overcome it?

Chris Theodore: The key will be talent; attracting and hiring, managing, inspiring and retaining talent. Our plan for addressing that will be what I eluded to earlier, which is we will keep our focus on the noble purpose of what we’re doing. And we will make sure that those who come aboard understand that this is not just about profitability, it’s about bringing something needed and that can transform hearts and individual’s lives into their homes that they wouldn’t have otherwise.

And I think that if we do a good job of not just communicating that, but actually living that and actually in our company, continue what we’re doing now, which is endeavoring to stay focused on the noble element and the purpose of what we’re doing, then that will continually enfranchise people who are working with us. But we’ll also be dealing with them in a way that they see congruency here and see that it’s real. And I want to be in an honest and real company. And that’s how I would answer that question and I’m not saying it’s going to be easy, but I’ll tell you this, it isn’t new to me. We will be able to apply a decade and a half of trial and error to the application of a very well thought-out plan in a market which is poised to accept what we’re doing.

Samir Husni: Is there anything that you’d like to add?

Chris Theodore: Blowing the lid off just a little more about the myth of advertising expenditures is something I find interesting and one of my favorites is, according to Ad Age magazine as well as BIA/Kelsey, a local advertising research company, of the $140 billion spent on local advertising last year, 50% was spent on some form of print advertising, 27% of the $140 billion was spent on direct mail. Interestingly, the projection for 2018 and by the way direct mail is the number one category of expenditures for local advertising in the United States; interestingly, it will remain so according to BIA/Kelsey in 2018. It will only go down by three percentage points.

But the most fascinating, I think, is how that shows people what’s happening with print and local advertising. It is $70 billion that is spent on print and that’s not talking about national advertising. That’s local advertising.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Chris Theodore: There’s really not one thing in particular. There’s not one thing that really keeps me up at night, because right now to be honest with you, my feeling is that it’s time to move. There are various times in life that we do things and that we want things, but right now it’s time to simply put it altogether and to move forward. It’s time to do this and time to expand. So, I’m not really taking a lot of time or worried about it.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

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For The Love Of Magazines And The People Who Make Them. Mr. Magazine’s™ Two New Books Are Out…

August 18, 2015

Inside 150-4 This week I received the first, hot off the press, copies of my two new books: Inside The Great Minds Of Magazine Makers, published by the Magazine Innovation Center, and printed by Trend Offset; and Managing Today’s News Media: Audience First, published by CQ Press, an imprint of Sage Publications, Inc. and co-authored with two of my colleagues Debora Halpern Wenger and Hank Price.

Practicing what I preach, I sat down with the two books and read every word as if I am the customer and not the author. And, if I may say so, it was a delight. So if you are interested in acquiring either of the two books or both of them, please find below the instructions to do so.

Managing Today's News Media 150-1 Inside The Great Minds Of Magazine Makers can be ordered directly from the Magazine Innovation Center by sending a check or money order for $100 to: Magazine Innovation Center, The University of Mississippi, 114 Farley Hall, University, MS 38655. The book will be shipped to you priority mail, signed by the author if you wish me to do that. For more information about the book click here.

To read more about Managing Today’s News Media: Audience First click here and to order a copy click here.

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Keeping It Authentic With The “Real Woman” – From Cover To Content – The Mr. Magazine™ Interview With Meredith Rollins, Editor-In-Chief, Redbook Magazine.

August 17, 2015

“Could the magazine exist without a print edition? Yes, I guess so. But I know that our readers love the tactile experience of getting a bound magazine in their mailboxes every month. And our subscription sales have been strong. But beyond that, just seeing how our Real Women Style Award winners circled back to our September issue and are on the cover of the magazine is enough to convince you of how much print matters. We unveiled it to one of the winners the other day and she had tears in her eyes and couldn’t believe she was on the cover of a magazine. I think that sums up why print is still an incredibly special medium.” Meredith Rollins

September - Real Women Style Awards Unlike a book, you can judge a magazine by its cover. And by now you’ve seen the cover of the September issue of Redbook magazine on TV, in social media and other outlets. Magazine covers were, are, and will continue to be story generators. This cover is no different in one way and a lot different in many other ways. Real style for real women has been the motto of Redbook magazine for years. In the world of women’s service magazines, Redbook has been around for generations, providing advice, style, recipes and affordable fashion with a down-to-earth mentality that its audience has come to know and love. And to balance all of the useful and helpful hints and tips the magazine offers each month, there are stories that cut right to the heart of the reader, engaging them with an emotional experience they don’t soon forget.

Meredith Rollins has been at the helm of the magazine for just over a year now, but she’s no stranger to Redbook, having been executive editor since 2010. She helped with the magazine’s redesign, which put the focus and the mainline on fun, affordable fashion, beauty and style. Something that Redbook zeros in on brilliantly.

I spoke with Meredith recently about the September issue cover and about her goals and plans for the future of the magazine. With the Real Women Style Awards, which is in its second year, the magazine showcases and honors “real” women everywhere and even featured the winners on the cover of the September issue. It was a fun and lively conversation, much like the personality of the lady herself.

So grab your most comfortable spot, your drink of choice and curl up and enjoy the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Meredith Rollins, Editor-In-Chief, Redbook.

But first, the sound-bites:

Meredith Rollins Headshot
On the gamble she took by putting a “real” woman on the cover of Redbook’s September issue:
This is our second year of the Real Women Style Awards; we did it for the first time last September and we just featured our winners in the actual pages of the magazine. And we know how much our readers love seeing real women on our pages. It’s so much easier to believe that an outfit or a makeup tip works in real life if you can see it on someone that you can relate to.

On whether she feels she’s taking an actual risk with the September cover or staying true to Redbook’s DNA:
I think I’m staying true to Redbook’s DNA definitely. Whether it’s a risky move or not; I guess time will tell about that, but I feel so passionately about it and I think it’s a perfect moment for this.

On her accomplishments within the last year of being named editor-in-chief:
I feel like I’m just starting, even though I’ve been editor for almost exactly a year. I think I’m really coming into my own as an editor. It takes longer than you might imagine to get up to speed and get to the right creative team in place. I have a new creative team and they’ve totally changed the way the magazine looks, from the covers all the way to the last page. Kirby Rodriguez is our creative director and he joined us last year in early November. And I think he’s a total genius and I’m really proud of the way that we’ve made women’s service look elegant and beautiful, and made affordably-priced fashions look like a million bucks.

On who would appear if she struck the magazine with a magic wand that had the ability to turn it into a living, breathing human being:
That’s a hard question. (Laughs) I don’t think that there’s just one person. I guess that’s what makes answering the question so hard; I know that our readers come in all shapes and sizes, some of them are stay-at-home parents, some of them are working incredibly hard outside and inside the office. They are schoolteachers, executives, parents when they’re not parents, but what they all have in common is they love style and beauty.

On the magazine’s personality and whom it reflects when it arrives at a reader’s home: I think it’s the embodiment of their best friend who has great advice and who knows exactly what she’s going through in her life. And who’s a lot of fun to be around. One of the best quotes that I’ve heard from a reader was that she thought the magazine was someone that she could sit down with and have a glass of wine with at the end of the day. And that’s exactly what I want.

On whether she believes that “best friend” persona of Redbook could be achieved without the print component:
Could the magazine exist without a print edition? Yes, I guess so. But I know that our readers love the tactile experience of getting a bound magazine in their mailboxes every month. And our subscription sales have been strong. But beyond that, just seeing how our Real Women Style Award winners circled back to our September issue and are on the cover of the magazine is enough to convince you of how much print matters. We unveiled it to one of the winners the other day and she had tears in her eyes and couldn’t believe she was on the cover of a magazine.

On the day-to-day process of putting a magazine with such a wide audience as Redbook together:
For me it goes back to this idea of shortcuts and quick information, balanced with stories that will really move you, because our readers still want beautiful writing. They want beautiful journalism and so we balance out all of the tips and advice in the magazine with things that feel meatier. Those are the stories that we get the most letters about honestly.

On what motivates her to get out of bed in the mornings and say it’s going to be a great day:
In terms of the magazine, it’s the excitement of working with an amazing team. I’m biased of course, but I really do think I have the best team in the business. We have 7 million readers and it’s such a privilege to talk to them; they’re smart; they’re fiery and they totally keep me on my toes. And I want to give them something that they’ll fall in love with.
Meredith's Editor's Note
On the biggest challenge she expects to face and how she will overcome it:
Our biggest challenge is that we need to be different. We need to have a point of difference and that’s always been true. And I think that’s true of any magazine. It’s finding a voice and having that voice on the pages of the magazine is incredibly important and always hard. And it’s keeping up with our audience, because they don’t want things to stay static; their interested in things constantly changing.

On whether innovation, as in Redbook’s partnership with Dove, has changed her role as editor from being just the voice of the brand to the brand voice of other brands as well:
No, I think as editor you’re inevitably the voice of the brand; you’re the one who’s out there in front of it. And it’s a job that I take very seriously, of course. And in terms of the Dove partnership, it was a purely editorial project; they weren’t part of the editorial process at all. It was great synergy and I think our messages on some levels are very much aligned. But it was a purely editorial project and one that I’m incredibly proud of. And honestly, it was something that I was going to do even before we started talking to Dove about it.

On what keeps her up at night:
My honest answer would have to be my eight-year-old. (Laughs) Every night there’s a new weird dream or he doesn’t have enough water or he’s too hot. He’s in the waking-up-in-the-middle-of-the-night mode and I love him more than life itself, but I do wish he’d let me sleep because I need the rest.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ conversation with Meredith Rollins, Editor-In-Chief, Redbook magazine.

Samir Husni: It’s been a little over a year now since you’ve been at the helm of Redbook. Let’s talk a bit about the gamble you’re taking with the September cover. It’s been said that unless it’s them, no one wants to see regular people on the cover of a magazine; they want to fantasize; they want to see a celebrity on the cover. Tell me the reasoning behind your decision to put a regular woman on the cover? Is she an ordinary woman who’s done extraordinary things perhaps?

Meredith Rollins: This is our second year of the Real Women Style Awards; we did it for the first time last September and we just featured our winners in the actual pages of the magazine. And we know how much our readers love seeing real women on our pages. It’s so much easier to believe that an outfit or a makeup tip works in real life if you can see it on someone that you can relate to.

So, it made sense to me that they would love to see them on the cover itself. And the Real Women Style Awards gave us the perfect opportunity to showcase these amazing women right there on the newsstand.

Samir Husni: I saw the piece written in Adweek about Redbook and what they called a “risky move” away from celebrities with this cover; do you feel that you’re taking any risk or just staying true to the nature and the DNA of the magazine?

Meredith Rollins: I think I’m staying true to Redbook’s DNA definitely. Whether it’s a risky move or not; I guess time will tell about that, but I feel so passionately about it and I think it’s a perfect moment for this. Our readers really want to see people who look like them; they want to see diversity and if it’s a risk, it’s one that I’m very willing to take.

Samir Husni: If we go back one year to when you were first named editor-in-chief of Redbook and then look one year ahead from now; what would you have accomplished during that time in either cementing the DNA of the magazine or altering it? Or finding a completely new and different Redbook?

Redbook Cover-2 Meredith Rollins: That’s such a good question. I feel like I’m just starting, even though I’ve been editor for almost exactly a year. I think I’m really coming into my own as an editor. It takes longer than you might imagine to get up to speed and to get the right creative team in place.

I have a new creative team and they’ve totally changed the way the magazine looks, from the covers all the way to the last page. Kirby Rodriguez is our creative director and he joined us last year in early November. And I think he’s a total genius and I’m really proud of the way that we’ve made women’s service look elegant and beautiful, and made affordably-priced fashions look like a million bucks.

I focused on women who are busy. I’m a mom myself and I know how pressed for time that I am. And how much that I’m looking forward to finding shortcuts and ways to make my life easier. So, I focused on that, on the one hand. And I focused on beautiful images, because I think our readers have wonderful tastes and I’m really trying to elevate the look of things, even if we’re photographing a $20 sweater, I want it to look incredible.

And the other thing that I’m really trying to do is focus on confidence and fearlessness and women feeling like they can come into their own. That’s been a true line for me and something that I’m focusing more and more on in the coming months.

Samir Husni: If I gave you a magic wand that had the ability to transform the August or September issue of Redbook into a living, breathing human being and you struck the magazine with it; who would appear?

Meredith Rollins: That’s a hard question. (Laughs) I don’t think that there’s just one person. I guess that’s what makes answering the question so hard; I know that our readers come in all shapes and sizes, some of them are stay-at-home parents, some of them are working incredibly hard outside and inside the office. They are schoolteachers, executives, parents when they’re not parents, but what they all have in common is they love style and beauty. They want the magazine to reflect who they are and to feel like an escape on the one hand, sort of their happy place, which is true for a lot of magazines, but particularly true for us, and they also need the magazine to be a way to make their lives easier.

We’ve certainly had great success with some celebrities on our cover and I think they tend to be women that our readers can really relate to. People like Kelly Clarkson or Alison Sweeney, who’s on the cover of the August issue, which is selling great. Those are the type of women that I think our readers want to see because they have an affinity for them. But by the same token, I’m really celebrating our readers with every issue.

Samir Husni: But when the reader gets her copy of Redbook in the mail; would you say that she feels like Meredith Rollins is coming to her at home and engaging her with a personal conversation, such as offering her advice or would Redbook today reflect more of a younger or older sibling speaking to her? Who would you say the “human” Redbook is when it arrives at the home of one of your readers?

Meredith Rollins: I think it’s the embodiment of their best friend who has great advice and who knows exactly what she’s going through in her life. And who’s a lot of fun to be around.

One of the best quotes that I’ve heard from a reader was that she thought the magazine was someone that she could sit down with and have a glass of wine with at the end of the day. And that’s exactly what I want. I don’t want the magazine to feel judgmental, like she isn’t doing enough or rich enough or she doesn’t have enough time to do an incredibly complicated craft. I want it to feel like a warm, welcoming place. And I think we’ve succeeded in that.

Samir Husni: Do you think that you could accomplish that moment that your reader described; that sit-down-with-a-friend-and-have-a-glass-of-wine appeal without the print component; if it was digital-only?

Meredith Rollins: Could the magazine exist without a print edition? Yes, I guess so. But I know that our readers love the tactile experience of getting a bound magazine in their mailboxes every month. And our subscription sales have been strong.

But beyond that, just seeing how our Real Women Style Award winners circled back to our September issue and are on the cover of the magazine is enough to convince you of how much print matters. We unveiled it to one of the winners the other day and she had tears in her eyes and couldn’t believe she was on the cover of a magazine. I think that sums up why print is still an incredibly special medium.

Samir Husni: You mean you don’t receive calls from celebrities or their people asking to be on Redbook’s website? They’re asking for the magazine cover?

Meredith Rollins: No, we put them on the website too, but for celebrities; I think it’s generally true that a big story in a magazine and also being a cover story still means a lot to them as well.

Samir Husni: Tell me about the day-to-day process of putting a magazine with such a wide audience as Redbook together? What goes through your brain as you perform your daily activities?

Meredith Rollins: As I said, I’m a mom too; I have two little boys who are eight and almost six. So, I think I’m really living the Redbook life. I get up in the morning; my household is crazy; I get them dressed and to school; I get to the office and then I have a moment of calm to think about what a woman like me, whether she works outside of the home or not, or whether her kids are in high school or preschool, might want from a magazine.

And for me it goes back to this idea of shortcuts and quick information, balanced with stories that will really move you, because our readers still want beautiful writing. They want beautiful journalism and so we balance out all of the tips and advice in the magazine with things that feel meatier. Those are the stories that we get the most letters about honestly.

We had a beautiful story in one of our recent issues about a woman who was in her 30s and looking into the future and thinking about her daughter. Her daughter and her sister had a very close bond. It’s a beautiful story and some things about it, of course, were dark and tragic, but at the end it was very hopeful and it was a wonderful musing on family. We received amazing letters about it.

It’s finding that right mix. It’s finding the lipstick she’s going to wear and love; the outfit that’s going to get her out of the door faster and the recipes that are healthy and won’t kill her diet, but are still very delicious, balanced with stories that she can really sink her teeth into.

Samir Husni: What motivates you every morning to get out of bed and say it’s going to be a great day?

Meredith Rollins: My boys get me out of bed far earlier than I might actually want to. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: (Laughs too).

Meredith Rollins: But in terms of the magazine, it’s the excitement of working with an amazing team. I’m biased of course, but I really do think I have the best team in the business. We have 7 million readers and it’s such a privilege to talk to them; they’re smart; they’re fiery and they totally keep me on my toes. And I want to give them something that they’ll fall in love with.

So, I feel that our readers set the bar really high and it’s a constant, exciting challenge to be rethinking the brand, reinventing the brand and in turn, giving them something that I know they’re going to love.

Samir Husni: You were saying that Redbook has 7 million readers; with a magazine of that size what do you think will be your biggest challenge as you move forward and how are you planning to overcome it?

Meredith Rollins: Our biggest challenge is that we need to be different. We need to have a point of difference and that’s always been true. And I think that’s true of any magazine. It’s finding a voice and having that voice on the pages of the magazine is incredibly important and always hard. And it’s keeping up with our audience, because they don’t want things to stay static; their interested in things constantly changing.

It’s easy to say, well, this page works; we’ll just do it every single month from now until eternity. So, I really like to change things up. Of course, we’ve found a formula that works, so we try to stick with it, but we try to change it in different ways. And I don’t think that you would look at the August issue and then look at the September issue and say, oh, they’re exactly the same. We really try to give our readers something new every single month.

Reflecting back on what I said before about our audience keeping me on my toes, I do think that’s the biggest challenge is to not give them the same old women’s service that they’ve already read in other places. To not give them recipes that they’ve already served; we want to give them something fresh and that’s going to make them excited to open the magazine when it arrives in their mailbox or when they pick it up on the newsstand.

Samir Husni: As you watch the magazine come to fruition, as each issue rolls out; you’re finding new ways of doing things, including teaming up with Dove, for example. Did this change your role as editor in any way? Are you now like the voice of the brand and the brand voice of other brands?

inside Redbook Meredith Rollins: No, I think as editor you’re inevitably the voice of the brand; you’re the one who’s out there in front of it. And it’s a job that I take very seriously, of course.

And in terms of the Dove partnership, it was a purely editorial project; they weren’t part of the editorial process at all. They knew that we were going to put the Real Women star award winner from the cover, obviously, that’s why we were able to have a gatefold cover, which is great, and we love that brand and the alignment was just right. But they were really surprised when they saw our winners and had a sneak preview of the cover last week. And it was fun to unveil it to them; they knew we were doing it, but they didn’t have any input on who we chose or the way we photographed them or any of the rest of it.

It was great synergy and I think our messages on some levels are very much aligned. But it was a purely editorial project and one that I’m incredibly proud of. And honestly, it was something that I was going to do even before we started talking to Dove about it.

Samir Husni: Do you think your role as editor, and the role of editor-in-chief in general, has changed over the last five or ten years?

Meredith Rollins: I think so, although it’s a little bit hard to answer the question because I wasn’t an editor-in-chief five years ago, but even as executive editor, you only see certain angles on the job. I can only tell you what it’s been like for the past year, but I do think there’s an emphasis on being different. And I do think that’s one of the great things that Hearst does, is that we’re constantly looking for new and interesting kinds of projects and that’s definitely an emphasis here at this company and at every single media company at this point.

And it’s just figuring out ways to do it that feels right for the brand and the alignment with Dove was exactly right for us. It might not be right for somebody else or a different kind of magazine, but it was perfect for us.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Meredith Rollins: My honest answer would have to be my eight-year-old. (Laughs) Every night there’s a new weird dream or he doesn’t have enough water or he’s too hot. He’s in the waking-up-in-the-middle-of-the-night mode and I love him more than life itself, but I do wish he’d let me sleep because I need the rest.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

h1

Super Yachting Anyone? You Only Need A Net Worth Of $680 Million To Join The Fun – But Not To Enjoy The Magazine – The Mr. Magazine™ Interview With Louis Coletti, Associate Publisher Luxury Advertising, ShowBoats International Magazine.

August 14, 2015

“I think print is the most powerful medium. I think it’s an engagement opportunity for consumers to be hands-on (no pun intended) and connected with the content. I’ve been a magazine fan since high school; I believe in print and always will believe in print. It’s something that you can take with you and have an intimate experience with. The photography is bold; the typography is modern and continues to change. It’s something that you can take with you no matter where you are, from the beach to the boardroom, onboard a boat or onboard a plane; it can go with you everywhere. There’s no place that you can’t take a magazine.” Louis Coletti

Showboats 3-14 For most of us the superyacht stratosphere of existence is but a mere fantasy that we dream about after a really large, superb dinner. But for some people, that’s not the case. Spending $10 million a year on maintenance alone for one of these magnificent vessels is just an annual expense that they write a check for unflinchingly. Just thinking about it makes me hyperventilate a bit.

ShowBoats International is a magazine dedicated to those individuals who can sail the seven seas in a style and luxury that many of us have never known, nor ever will. But it’s definitely entertaining to read about.

According to Louis Coletti, associate publisher luxury advertising for the magazine, ShowBoats International has the wealthiest readership of any publication in the United States, with the mean net worth of a superyacht owner estimated at $680 million. The magazine has the highest concentration of ultra-high net worth individuals and billionaire’s listed among its readership and provides the content this echelon of people need to stay up-to-date and abreast of what’s going on in the superyacht and mega yacht communities.

Louis is determined to take this superyacht brand to a whole new level. I spoke with him recently and we talked about the redesign and relaunch of the U.S. edition of the brand beginning with the March 2015 issue of the magazine. Louis said investments were made in editorial content, paper stock and the overall size and binding of the publication, proving that not only do us mere mortals appreciate the power of print, but so do the ultra-mega-rich as well.

Some mindboggling statistics that Louis provided for Mr. Magazine™ only goes to show that a niche audience takes on a whole new meaning when it comes to the superyacht community:


• Many superyacht owners keep their vessels for no more than three years before selling up.

• In 2013, 355 superyachts were sold with a total combined price of $3.4 billion U.S.

• Of the 125 owners’ nationalities identified, 14% were Americans, followed closely by Russians.

• Luxury yachts top the list of the ten most expensive asset purchases ever recorded.

• 10% of the yacht purchase price is usually paid immediately.

So, as you let those statistics sink in, I hope you enjoy the Mr. Magazine™ interview with a man who rubs elbows with the ultra-wealthy quite often, but keeps his feet firmly planted on the ground when it comes to the future of his brand, Louis Coletti, Associate Publisher Luxury Advertising, ShowBoats International Magazine.

But first, the sound-bites:

Louis Coletti
On defining the superyacht community:
It really is a fascinating community. The superyacht world is becoming more known and more aware in the United States now, thanks to social media and all of the entertainment channels. As you know, super yachting has been a very big presence in Europe; it’s been part of their culture for decades and centuries with Sardinia and St. Moritz, Monaco and the French Riviera and all over Italy. Yachts are in the harbors there and can be seen all year long, but it’s just becoming known here in the U.S., which is exciting for us.

On the need for a magazine like ShowBoats Magazine in the scheme of things: We’re globally the number one content provider in the superyacht world, for both the motor boat and sailing. We have the strongest hold on the community, in terms of the inside access to who these people are and the people who create this industry. We’ve been around for over 30 years and it’s the number one trusted media brand in the superyacht world. We host the largest and most high profile private event in the industry; we host over 14 global events, exclusively for superyacht and mega yacht owners, brokers and builders.

On the superyacht owner’s estimated net worth being $680 million and whether advertisers are waiting in line to get inside the magazine’s pages because of that:
Our advertising clients directly get it. Every time that I meet with a client, especially Europeans – Italians or French, they immediately understand exactly who this audience is. They’ve been around it, especially as a luxury marketer, they understand who these people are and how powerful and influential they are, and most importantly how private they are.

On the redesign, rebranding and relaunch of the magazine: We increased the trim size as you saw. We have top-quality paper stock and beautiful binding for the magazine; big, bold photography and to improve the design we cut the issue cover-to-cover, beginning with the March issue. And together with our investors as well as many of our readers that attend our events; they all kept speaking to my CEO and the editors about including luxury lifestyle content in the magazine.

On why he thinks we still need print in this digital age: I think print is the most powerful medium. I think it’s an engagement opportunity for consumers to be hands-on (no pun intended) and connected with the content. I’ve been a magazine fan since high school; I believe in print and always will believe in print. It’s something that you can take with you and have an intimate experience with. The photography is bold; the typography is modern and continues to change. It’s something that you can take with you no matter where you are, from the beach to the boardroom, onboard a boat or onboard a plane; it can go with you everywhere. There’s no place that you can’t take a magazine.

On the biggest stumbling block he’s had to face:
It’s brand development basically. We just opened a New York office in April 2015 and I’m here in charge of building all the luxury non-marine; everything that’s non-marine related. It’s just building the brand; making people aware that ShowBoats International is redesigned and relaunched. We have the most powerful audience, in terms of wealth and influence. It’s just about educating people on what the superyacht and mega yacht world is and what it’s about; the amount of money that it takes to participate in this community and that a superyacht is literally the most expensive consumer item for purchase on earth right now.

On how it makes him feel to be in the company of people with ultra-high net worth’s:
It’s exciting to be part of this development. I wish that it was easily understood, in terms of when I talk about super yachting, I just wish more people would understand exactly what it means. And what this industry is about.

On anything else he’d like to add:
The way I see this media opportunity/partnership with us is more a financial decision than a media decision. If marketers are looking to affect their bottom line in a significant way and move product; move a luxury auto off the lot; move a $150,000 timepiece out of the showcase; move custom, made-to-order pretty much anything that’s in their stable of offerings; this is the audience to do it.

On what keeps him up at night: What keeps me up the most honestly though is the excitement of wanting to get out and see more people and do more and just build this brand and take it to a whole new level. I’m in month four, going on month five, and sometimes it feels like it’s been two years and sometimes it feels like it’s been five weeks. Every day it’s new and exciting.

And now for the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ conversation with Louis Coletti, Associate Publisher Luxury Advertising, ShowBoats International Magazine.

Samir Husni: Tell me a little about the superyacht community.

Showboats 2-13 Louis Coletti: It really is a fascinating community. The superyacht world is becoming more known and more aware in the United States now, thanks to social media and all of the entertainment channels.

As you know, super yachting has been a very big presence in Europe; it’s been part of their culture for decades and centuries with Sardinia and St. Moritz, Monaco and the French Riviera and all over Italy. Yachts are in the harbors there and can be seen all year long, but it’s just becoming known here in the U.S., which is exciting for us.

I’m not sure if you’re aware of this, but Ft. Lauderdale is the third largest shipbuilding, manufacturing and marina setting in North and South America. It’s actually the third largest in the world. It’s the top largest in North and South America.

Most Europeans still have their superyachts here in Ft. Lauderdale during the wintertime when they’re doing the transatlantic trips. They send their boats ahead with the captain and the crew and then they meet up with them in Florida. So, it’s become really big, which is very exciting for us. We’re very happy about all of the attention the community has been getting.

Samir Husni: I’m hearing a lot lately that the reason we exist in print is because of the impact of social media and the Internet and how it’s introducing the world to each other. What is the need for ShowBoats International Magazine in the scheme of these introductions?

Louis Coletti: We’re globally the number one content provider in the superyacht world, for both the motor boat and sailing. We have the strongest hold on the community, in terms of the inside access to who these people are and the people who create this industry. We’ve been around for over 30 years and it’s the number one trusted media brand in the superyacht world. We host the largest and most high profile private event in the industry; we host over 14 global events, exclusively for superyacht and mega yacht owners, brokers and builders.

So, it’s really these great partnerships and we have access in terms of exclusive interviews; we get invited onboard for the new build before they’re launched. We have what’s called the Superyacht Design Symposium, which is an event that we host once a year where all the top superyacht architects and designers gather together. It’s a three-day event that’s an open forum and discussion, plus there are seminars and other types of events there as well. And they’ll all get together once a year to share the new updates and ideas on technology, regulations, design opportunities and new build that are coming out. So, we’re involved on the build side as well as the actual boats themselves being launched on the water.

Samir Husni: In addition to that, you have the Ultra High Net Worth individuals in the world; I’m quoting you from your email. You said the superyacht owner is estimated at $680 million, that’s the mean net worth. How do you utilize that audience in reaching the advertisers? You’re in charge of the luxury advertising for the magazines of the brand; when you go meet with an ad agency, are they just champing at the bit to advertise in the magazines?

Louis Coletti: That’s a very interesting question. When I meet with a client directly, they get it immediately. They understand the amount of money that it takes to be a superyacht owner. And additionally, the amount of money that it takes to support the lifestyle that evolves with this community.

On average, they spend two months out of the year on their superyachts. They have a whole life outside of their boating activities. So, for them to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on something they only spend two months a year on, they have an excessive amount of income to spend supporting their hobby and their luxuries.

So our advertising clients directly get it. Every time that I meet with a client, especially Europeans – Italians or French, they immediately understand exactly who this audience is. They’ve been around it, especially as a luxury marketer, they understand who these people are and how powerful and influential they are, and most importantly how private they are.

The ability to gain access is what we provide. We provide inside access with people who we have very intimate relationships with. And you can just imagine based on the size of these boats and they’re all new build that we feature in the magazine. Every issue when you receive ShowBoats International and you see the content, every boat in there is a new build; every boat that’s in there is one of our readers, and we only feature yachts of a 100 ft. or larger on the cover. So, if you have an 80 ft. yacht and it’s spectacular, it might not make the cover, because our rule is 100 ft. or larger.

Also another statistic is on average they spend 10% of the cost of the yachts annually on maintenance. For example, they’ll spend $100 million on their yacht at purchase and then they’re spending $10 million per year to maintain it. Between fuel, docking fees, insurance; whatever they pay in terms of a captain’s salary, crew salaries and everything else that goes along with it, it’s about 10% a year that they spend. That automatically increases the caliber of wealth behind these people. Steven Spielberg is one of our readers. He’s one of the biggest superyacht owners in the Americas, pretty much in the world, but definitely in the Americas.

This explains the difference between a high net worth individual and a very high net worth individual, (Laughs) or an ultra-high net worth person.

Samir Husni: (Laughs too) Yes, ultra-high indeed.

Louis Coletti: Yes, ultra, as they’re definitely called.

Samir Husni: I was in L.A. with a friend at the marina and he was showing me the yacht of Microsoft’s Paul Allen…

Louis Coletti: Yes, he owns three. He has three superyachts. And up until two years ago, he had the largest yacht on the water. He spent around $200 million building that boat. And one year later billionaire Roman Abramovich built a yacht 10 feet larger just to beat Paul Allen. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: (Laughs too).

Louis Coletti: It’s very competitive. Who wants to have the fastest boat; who wants to have the biggest boat; who wants to have one of the top architects and designers building their boat? It’s a very, very competitive community and it’s a very small community too. It’s just the richest people in the world.

Samir Husni: You said that Spielberg has the biggest now?

Louis Coletti: Well, there are two that are vying for the biggest superyacht on earth; one is a Malaysian businessman and one is a guy with no name from the Middle East. Those two are being discussed as the largest boats on the water. But that could always change.

Samir Husni: In March, the entire magazine was relaunched, redesigned and rebranded; tell me a little about the before and after of ShowBoats International.

Louis Coletti: Before it was a different trim size, a different paper stock, a different type of production quality and not as luxurious as you see it today. And it was strictly cover-to-cover boating. It was a place for the boats’ owners to have a showcase, but also for brokers to market and showcase their clients’ boats that were up for charter. Basically, it was a very specific trade-type of magazine, although it was for anyone who appreciated boating, but really for the superyacht owner.

We have a new group of investors in the company; Tara Getty, for instance, from the Getty family Art Foundation; Tara Getty is one of our investors. H
e’s a superyacht owner and very involved in the community.

And together with our investors as well as many of our readers that attend our events; they all kept speaking to my CEO and the editors about including luxury lifestyle content in the magazine. These are very, very busy people; they’re all over the world and they own several homes; they’re not in one place too often. So, the opportunity to read one publication that they’re most excited about; the number one passion point should be yachting. And to infuse it with other luxury content such as watches; they’re big collectors of luxury timepieces. That’s another thing that they spend so much of their money on is watches. Luxury automobiles, fashion, jewelry, spirits, technology and things like that.

We took the liberty to hire new editors; our editor-in-chief in the U.K. Sacha Bonsor; she comes from Hearst, where she worked at Harper’s Bazaar and she’s editor-in-chief in the U.K. overseeing all of the content. She’s very well connected in the luxury space and she’s bringing really fantastic contributors onboard to build the luxury content in the magazine. And it has been so well-received; readers are just praising the redesign; they love the fact that we’re including this new content in addition to boating. And it’s really brought a new element to the brand.

We increased the trim size as you saw. We have top-quality paper stock and beautiful binding for the magazine; big, bold photography and to improve the design we cut the issue cover-to-cover, beginning with the March issue.

Our sister publication, Boat International, which is for our European market and based in the U.K., they did their redesign first. Their redesign launched in October 2014. And then ShowBoats International for the U.S. was redesigned as of March 2015.

Samir Husni: With the redesign and relaunch of the brand; tell me a little about the power of the print publication. You’ve invested in the quality of the paper; you’ve invested in the branding; you’ve invested in the editorial content; why do you think in this digital age people still need print?

Louis Coletti: I think print is the most powerful medium. I think it’s an engagement opportunity for consumers to be hands-on (no pun intended) and connected with the content. I’ve been a magazine fan since high school; I believe in print and always will believe in print. It’s something that you can take with you and have an intimate experience with. The photography is bold; the typography is modern and continues to change. It’s something that you can take with you no matter where you are, from the beach to the boardroom, onboard a boat or onboard a plane; it can go with you everywhere. There’s no place that you can’t take a magazine.

And it’s a whole different experience, in terms of content. Does print and digital work well together? Absolutely. We have content online that’s not in the magazine. We also have videos online as well.

That’s another thing, our company has its own video production company and we produce videos for all of the major yacht builders. We produce videos for all of our events. We produce and host The Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta twice a year; once in Sardinia and once in the Caribbean and we’ve been doing it for eight years with Loro Piana. And we videotape the entire week’s events, from start to finish. All the races; all the interviews; all the entertainment; all of it is recorded in a beautiful documentary way. And we press those videos online.

We also host what’s called The World Superyacht Awards. It’s similar to The Oscars for the superyacht industry and it’s something that our readers look forward to every single year. It’s with several different, very high-profile luxury partners. Baccarat builds the statue for us that they win, it’s called The Neptune, and it’s a very big deal. It’s a black-tie event that’s hosted in a different country around the world every year. And we videotape that entire event and we press that online too.

So, the content online is much different. We also list now over 7,000 superyachts for sale and for charter; it’s the number one directory for sale and charter in the industry. And we host that on our sites. We also produce what’s called the Superyacht Register, which is an outline of every detail of the top superyachts in the world. And it lists the builder, the year it was built, the owner, the architect, the interior designer, the size and speed of the boat; all the specifics of the boats are registered.

My point with this is it’s a whole different experience and additional content that’s found online.

Showboats 1-12 Samir Husni: With all the glitz and glamour of the superyacht world; what has been the biggest stumbling block that you’ve had to face and how did you overcome it?

Louis Coletti: It’s brand development basically. We just opened a New York office in April 2015 and I’m here in charge of building all the luxury non-marine; everything that’s non-marine related. It’s just building the brand; making people aware that ShowBoats International is redesigned and relaunched.

We have the most powerful audience, in terms of wealth and influence. It’s just about educating people on what the superyacht and mega yacht world is and what it’s about; the amount of money that it takes to participate in this community and that a superyacht is literally the most expensive consumer item for purchase on earth right now. Until you can own private rocket-ships going up into space; there isn’t anything more expensive than superyachts. It costs more than any real estate, any watch, any piece of art, any automobile, and any airplane. The average cost of a plane is $5 million; these people spend more than that just maintaining their boat. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: (Laughs too).

Louis Coletti: It’s just a matter now of really educating the community. The challenge has been, I’d say, the ad agencies; not clients. Clients get it immediately. They’ve been on a superyacht; they know someone who owns a superyacht; they’ve been in St. Tropez, St. Bart’s or Sardinia and they see these superyachts in the harbors or out at sea, so they understand exactly what I’m saying. Several of my clients are part of this community. David Geffen is one of our readers; he owns two superyachts. I think I mentioned that Steven Spielberg is one of our readers; Paul Allen is one of our readers; Mark Zuckerberg is a reader; these people own superyachts and we’re the number one content provider in this community. If they own a boat, it’s registered with us; they get the magazine.

Samir Husni: How does it make you feel to be in such company?

Louis Coletti: It’s exciting to be part of this development. I wish that it was easily understood, in terms of when I talk about super yachting, I just wish more people would understand exactly what it means. And what this industry is about.

But like everything, it takes time and we’re making great progress. We’ve already secured seven new luxury clients that have never worked with us in this yachting space before. We’re getting a lot of interest for 2016 from a lot of the A-list top luxury brands across all categories, not just in the watch category. I wish there were more like me. (Laughs) I wish there were 10 of me; it would make it happen a lot faster.

We’re in building mode right now. We know our strengths. There are other magazines in this space, but they can’t compare to what we’re doing. They don’t have events and if they do, not at the caliber of the events that we have. They definitely don’t have the guest list of attendees that we have. They don’t have the respect and the appreciation for our quality content that we have.

It feels good to be the leader; it’s just being a leader in a space that’s not so widely-known in the U.S. yet.

Samir Husni: Is there anything else that you’d like to add?

Louis Coletti: The way I see this media opportunity/partnership with us is more a financial decision than a media decision. If marketers are looking to affect their bottom line in a significant way and move product; move a luxury auto off the lot; move a $150,000 timepiece out of the showcase; move custom, made-to-order pretty much anything that’s in their stable of offerings; this is the audience to do it.

It’s not about branding; it’s not about running ads in this magazine or that magazine because so-and-so is friends with the editor-in-chief or doing favors for a favor. I understand the importance of all that and that’s definitely a part of how this industry works, but in our case it really is about a financial decision. You invest in us and the rate of return is so much higher than pretty much any other magazine or media available. And it’s because of the amount of wealth and influence that these people have. And it’s a global community. ShowBoats International is for U.S.-based superyacht owners and Boat International is for European superyacht owners; however, combined together it’s a global community. They travel the circuit. They’re all in the Mediterranean at the same time and when the seasons change they go over to the Caribbean and spend time and then they travel to the Americas around the same time, based on the climate and the season. And it’s a circuit. Sometimes you can see five or ten, maybe more, of these superyachts in the same vicinity. We post on our website about whose yacht was spotted where.

Just keep an eye on us. If you’re ever going to follow the America’s Cup, now is an exciting time to do that. We publish America’s Cup updates on our site daily. Right now it’s going on as the World Series and so we’re featuring content on the America’s Cup for the next two years. The World Series just started in June.

The way I see this media opportunity/partnership with us was more a financial decision than a media decision. If marketers are looking to affect their bottom line in a significant way and move product; move a luxury auto off the lot; move a $150,000 timepiece out of the showcase; make custom made-to-order pretty much anything that’s in their stable of offerings; this is the audience to do it.

So, just keep an eye on us and it’ll be exciting to see the growth and the new achievements that we make.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Louis Coletti: (Laughs) Thinking of everything that I have to get done the next day; things that I didn’t get to scratch off my to-do list that day, which carries over to tomorrow.

What keeps me up the most honestly though is the excitement of wanting to get out and see more people and do more and just build this brand and take it to a whole new level. I’m in month four, going on month five, and sometimes it feels like it’s been two years and sometimes it feels like it’s been five weeks. Every day it’s new and exciting. Just knowing how much we have yet to do is both exciting and keeps me up at night sometimes.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

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