Archive for February, 2018

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The Roadmap To Magazine Success As Told By Wired Magazine’s Editor In Chief, Nick Thompson, To Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni: “You Need To Create The Right Stories; You Need To Get Them Out To People In All The Right Ways; And You Need To Build A Business Model Around That.” The Mr. Magazine™ Interview…

February 8, 2018

“There’s something about the print magazine that’s special. It’s got the front cover, which is a way to really make a statement. It has a back cover that advertisers love. It has the capacity to package things, because the Internet breaks everything up, so the capacity to keep things together is really valuable. And advertisers see that too.” Nick Thompson…

This year, Wired Magazine will celebrate 25 years of publishing some of the best content in the world of technology. And this year, the brand will also inaugurate its editor in chief’s latest edition to the business model: a paywall. For over six years, Nick Thompson was an editor for newyorker.com and learned the art of the paywall; and the benefits. Bringing that knowledge to Wired, where he has ran the tech-ship for just over a year, he has constructed a new revenue source that he’s hoping will prove that people are willing to pay for quality content, for something they value and that adds value to their lives.

On a recent trip to New York, I spoke with Nick about the changes he’s implemented, such as the paywall. For a tech-savvy man, Nick is a rare breed, because he also believes in the power of print. So, Print Proud Digital Smart is just common sense to him, and Mr. Magazine™ would have to agree. And Mr. Magazine™ also believes in the value of content, just as Nick does. So, the paywall, while tried and failed by many before him, seems possible with the determination and vision that Nick possesses. Not only possible; probable, but also success-able.

From an email to Wired subscribers, and in Nick’s own words, he had this to say about the paywall: “As you may have seen in the press, we’re launching a paywall on WIRED.com—an important and exciting step that will allow us to continue our great work for the next quarter-century and beyond.” Indeed, if the next 25 is anything like the first 25, everyone will be willing to “pixel-up.” And now the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Nick Thompson, editor in chief, Wired. Enjoy!

But first the sound-bites:

On why he thinks it took the industry so long to change from a welfare information society where everything digital was given away freely to one that charges for its online content: I think business was really good in the old model for a long time. We made a lot of money from advertising and it took a while for the industry to realize the problems with that. And it took a long time for the industry to realize that digital advertising wouldn’t replace it.
I believe we came to those realizations too slowly.

On the secret of Wired’s longevity: That’s an interesting question. It’s always been really good, that’s the first thing. When it had rough patches, it figured its way out of them. It never found any of the traps of some of the other tech publications. It had Condé Nast supporting it as well. And because it had been relatively early, it had a lot of loyal supporters and backers. So, it’s always had a really good and strong fan base, and it’s always had a great group of writers.

On Condé Nast’s handling of Wired over the years, and the fact that when most bigger companies buy small, entrepreneurial publications, they end of folding them, but not in the case of Wired: I wonder about that. I think that reflects very well on Condé Nast. They changed editors; they did all of the things that usually happen when a rogue publication is bought by a big company. They changed editors; they changed philosophy, but I think they kept a hands-off approach. A lot of people stayed through; the magazine stayed in San Francisco, and I think Condé Nast realized the independent spirit that Wired had, and managed it well.

On how he would define content today: That’s a good question. You have to think about all of the different places where we publish unique content. There’s the print magazine; the website; the Snapchat channel; the Instagram feed; there are all kinds of things. There are videos that we’re making for Facebook live; YouTube videos that we’re creating. So, it’s all Wired content; it’s all Wired “stuff” and my involvement in it ranges from the print, where there’s a lot, to social where there’s less. And then I’m participating in a lot of it. I’ll do some of the Facebook lives or some of the discussions.

On whether he feels he’s more of a curator today than a creator: No, more of a creator, but the curation is part of it too, because part of what you do is figure out how things should be promoted; what should go in the newsletter; how the newsletter should be structured. I write my own newsletter; I do my own Tweets; I do Facebook; so, there’s that part of the curation element. But most of what I’m doing is writing and editing.

On the biggest stumbling block he’s had to face, or whether it has it all been a walk in a rose garden: You need to do three things when you’re in my job: you need to create the right stories; you need to get them out to people in all the right ways; and you need to build a business model around that. And I feel like we’re creating the right stories and that we’ve built a business model, but I’m not sure that we’ve optimized getting ourselves out there in all the right ways. So, the biggest challenge is how do you get people to read your content on a mobile device? Some people will go to your website on a mobile device, but mostly they’ll go to your Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, or they’ll come in through an app.

On the iPad and how Wired was one of the first Condé Nast titles to jump onboard: And it was awesome. My predecessor, Scott Dadich, he designed that, and did a killer job. The issue is, back then we all thought the iPad was the future of magazine reading, right? And that people would have iPads and they would download all of the magazines. But as it turned out, the iPad wasn’t; it turned out to be the phone. The question is, can you take the iPad version and make it work on the phone, that’s something that we need to do here, because we have a great iPad app, but we don’t have an iPhone app.

On how he decides what content goes where and if dissecting that content is getting easier or harder: In the old days, content was created for print and dissected for the other platforms, and here it’s more that we try to come up with content that works on all of the platforms, starting from an idea. The Free Speech package was definitely something we came up with for the print medium, because the idea on how to do it was a big structured thing around it, and that still works when you have the excuse of a print magazine that gets mailed to 850,000 people, and that has a cover and a set number of pages. So, we decided to do that and spread it out on all of the other platforms.

On why he still believes in print: There are a couple of reasons. Number one, because I spend a lot of time on tech, I realize its limitations. You can put out a Tweet and you can look and say that you have 10 million Twitter followers; that Tweet is going to reach 10 million people, but actually it’s not. A thousand people are going to click on it, or 200 people are going to click on it. So, there are real distribution issues on all platforms. When you think about it that way, it helps you remember that the U.S. Postal Service that will deliver 850,000 copies of these to people’s doors, or whatever the exact number is right now, is a pretty good distribution mechanism.

On how he edits the magazine to cater to the geeks and the intellectuals simultaneously: That’s the whole challenge of this job. It’s to cater to both of them and even to people who are coming to technology for the first time. And that’s a challenge with our web content and that’s a challenge with Snapchat content; that’s a challenge with everything we do. That’s less of a print challenge than it is an overall Wired challenge. And there, we try to think of ourselves as a magazine about change, not as a magazine about tech. We think about the way technology is changing our lives; changing our world and the way that we relate to each other. Find the most interesting questions and answer them in the smartest way that we can, in whatever form is appropriate for whatever medium we’re writing for.

On how his job as a magazine editor, especially of Wired, is different today than it was some years ago: The first difference is that, obviously, we’re publishing in more different ways. And the world only gets more complicated; the job only gets more complicated; and your time only gets more disbursed, because you’re not doing a print magazine, you’re doing a print magazine and a website and all of these social platforms. So, that’s different.

On one moment he can reflect on since he’s been editor where he thought the magazine was at the exact place he wanted it to be: This month has been amazing, because I think our Free Speech issue conveys exactly what I want to do with the magazine. It has five essays, all of which are awesome; they read really well together. I think it’s one of the smartest packages put together on free speech.

On whether he thinks it will be smooth sailing from now on: (Laughs) I don’t think any editor in this business would think it’s smooth sailing from now on. We have to think about what comes next, so we have to make the paywall work. We’re just days in and it looks good so far, but that’s nothing. We need to make sure that we optimize and that we figure out the right ways to promote it; that we reduce friction in the subscription process; that we improve re-circulation; that we assign the right content; and that is really hard. Then we also need to figure out how to continue to diversify our revenue streams.

On whether he feels like in his job now he has to hop on and off the train without it ever stopping: (Laughs) No, I feel like the train still stops. Maybe in two years the train won’t stop and I’ll be jumping out the window. Right now it’s okay. It’s funny, because I don’t think the job of editor in chief of Wired will ever get less complicated, because you have to be in the middle of the way technology is reshaping the world, and the nature of technology is that it accelerates, because when you invent something it helps you invent the next thing.

On why he thinks the whole media world is suddenly watching Wired and its new paywall to see if it succeeds or fails: I think the fact that it’s Wired and we’re considered to be at the forefront of technology makes a big difference. I think to some people it’s surprising. You may think that Wired would always make its information free. Though, since the very beginning Wired has talked about the value of content and whether it’s important to make people pay. And there’s a huge debate among the early Wired founders. I’m glad people are paying attention. The more attention, the better.

On what someone would find him doing if they showed up unexpectedly one evening at his home: You’ll find me reading magazine stories on my phone, if I’ve finished my work. I tend to go home and work; I work here, then I go home and put my kids to sleep, and I tend to go back to work, in part, because I work with a lot of people in San Francisco, so my 10:00 p.m. is their 7:00 p.m., so we’re synced up pretty well. And I tend to work until 11:00 or 11:0 p.m. And if I finish and have some time, I like to read magazine stories in other publications. And I like to play guitar.

On what he would have tattooed upon his brain that would be there forever and no one could ever forget about him: That I actually really care about my job. I care about Wired because I think it’s really important for society to have these conversations about technology, such as free speech and technology. And I feel like Wired plays a really important civic role. So, I want them to realize that what excites me about this job and what I do isn’t just because it’s a cool job and I work in media. It’s because there’s real civic value in having this thing work and to do it well. And that’s why I try.

On what keeps him up at night: I don’t think any editor in chief of any publication sleeps well, with the business changes over the last few years. I worry a lot that we get stories right and I worry a lot about what comes next for us. What are the product, engineering and business choices we need to make to be sure that we can continue to produce really great journalism. So, that keeps me up at night.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Nick Thompson, editor in chief, Wired.

Samir Husni: You’ve been in the news a lot lately for doing what I’ve always called a common sense thing; if you have good content, people will pay for it. Why do you think the industry waited so long to change from a welfare information society where we give everything away for free to finally charging for content?

Nick Thompson: I think business was really good in the old model for a long time. We made a lot of money from advertising and it took a while for the industry to realize the problems with that. And it took a long time for the industry to realize that digital advertising wouldn’t replace it.
I believe we came to those realizations too slowly.

Samir Husni: Specifically with Wired, as you approach your 25th anniversary; a lot of tech magazines have started up and folded during that same period, all trying to captivate the future of technology and humanizing technology. What’s the secret of Wired’s longevity?

Nick Thompson: That’s an interesting question. It’s always been really good, that’s the first thing. When it had rough patches, it figured its way out of them. It never found any of the traps of some of the other tech publications. It had Condé Nast supporting it as well. And because it had been relatively early, it had a lot of loyal supporters and backers. So, it’s always had a really good and strong fan base, and it’s always had a great group of writers.

I don’t know, I feel like it never even came close to going away. It’s been a good publication with lots of supporters the whole way through, lots of advertisers; a good subscription base. It’s been healthy and strong and it’s managed to never completely screw things up.

Samir Husni: From an historical point of view, when I study all of the magazines that were started by entrepreneurs and sold to big companies, the bigger companies managed to mess them up and fold them. That’s not the case with Wired.

Nick Thompson: I think that reflects very well on Condé Nast. They changed editors; they did all of the things that usually happen when a rogue publication is bought by a big company. They changed editors; they changed philosophy, but I think they kept a hands-off approach. A lot of people stayed through; the magazine stayed in San Francisco, and I think Condé Nast realized the independent spirit that Wired had, and managed it well.

So, I think it reflects well on Condé Nast and I think it reflects well on the Wired team and it reflects well on Katrina Heron, who took it over after the transaction, and then Chris Anderson, who succeeded her.

Samir Husni: As you are moving Wired toward the next quarter of a century, you started by adding a paywall; you’ve been quoted as saying print is not going away, that you still believe in it. So, as an editor today, how do you define content?

Nick Thompson: That’s a good question. You have to think about all of the different places where we publish unique content. There’s the print magazine; the website; the Snapchat channel; the Instagram feed; there are all kinds of things. There are videos that we’re making for Facebook live; YouTube videos that we’re creating.

So, if you were to look at my to-do list for today, I have to read some of the drafts for the next issue of the print magazine; I’ve got to read a bunch of web posts that have gone live, make sure they’re good and figure out how to promote them and how to help the writers improve, or how to work with the writers. I have to think about all of the social media platforms. So, it’s all Wired content; it’s all Wired “stuff” and my involvement in it ranges from the print, where there’s a lot, to social where there’s less. And then I’m participating in a lot of it. I’ll do some of the Facebook lives or some of the discussions.

There’s way too much content for any single human to be involved in, so I just have to figure out how to allocate my time in a way that is most effective, both for specific editing and the more general sense of conveying my view of what a Wired story is. And then the general coaching, managing and cheerleading the staff and all of the stories.

Samir Husni: Do you feel you’re more of a curator today, rather than a creator?

Nick Thompson: No, more of a creator, but the curation is part of it too, because part of what you do is figure out how things should be promoted; what should go in the newsletter; how the newsletter should be structured. I write my own newsletter; I do my own Tweets; I do Facebook; so, there’s that part of the curation element. But most of what I’m doing is writing and editing.

There are 100 different things that could be a part of my job and I try to think about all of them. And I try to weigh whether I can actually be helpful with #96 on the list of things, and if I can, I’ll spend some time on it and if I can’t, I’ll let it be.

Samir Husni: What has been the biggest stumbling block that you’ve had to face since you took over the editorship and how did you overcome it? Or has it been a walk in a rose garden?

Nick Thompson: I’ve been really happy with the print magazine for the last few months. I feel like we’ve gotten a really strong feature well, and we’ve gotten really good covers. If you look at our next cover, which I shouldn’t talk about, but I think it will be exciting. And our free speech cover; the cover about China; the cover on our issue now. We’ve done really good issues. And when I started, it wasn’t like they were bad, they were still good.

But I feel like there has been steady improvement in making sure that the feature well, in particular, has grown and become really close to what I wanted it to be when I started this job. So, that’s good, but it was also really hard, so maybe that’s the answer.

The other thing that’s hard is obviously, you need to do three things when you’re in my job: you need to create the right stories; you need to get them out to people in all the right ways; and you need to build a business model around that. And I feel like we’re creating the right stories and that we’ve built a business model, but I’m not sure that we’ve optimized getting ourselves out there in all the right ways. So, the biggest challenge is how do you get people to read your content on a mobile device? Some people will go to your website on a mobile device, but mostly they’ll go to your Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, or they’ll come in through an app.

We don’t yet have a custom IOS app. We have read platforms or a progressive web app, which makes our Android reading experience much better, but we were a little late to optimize ourselves on mobile devices. So, that’s something that we’re working hard on, but we haven’t completely solved yet.

In my ideal world, there would be a fantastic, beautifully-designed way to read Wired through Flipboard, Apple News, Facebook Instant, an IOS app, an Android app, and a progressive web app, but we don’t have that whole suite of things yet. We have some of them, but they require design, product, engineering and business, and so they’re really complicated to get right.

Samir Husni: I remember when the iPad first came into being back in the dark ages of 2009, Wired was a forerunner. I think it was the first Condé Nast magazine to jump onboard.

Nick Thompson: And it was awesome. My predecessor, Scott Dadich, he designed that, and did a killer job. The issue is, back then we all thought the iPad was the future of magazine reading, right? And that people would have iPads and they would download all of the magazines. But as it turned out, the iPad wasn’t; it turned out to be the phone. The question is, can you take the iPad version and make it work on the phone, that’s something that we need to do here, because we have a great iPad app, but we don’t have an iPhone app.

Samir Husni: With your role, and the many hats that you wear, how do you decide what content goes where? From print to digital, and now with the paywall; is dissecting the content getting easier or harder?

Nick Thompson: In the old days, content was created for print and dissected for the other platforms, and here it’s more that we try to come up with content that works on all of the platforms, starting from an idea. The Free Speech package was definitely something we came up with for the print medium, because the idea on how to do it was a big structured thing around it, and that still works when you have the excuse of a print magazine that gets mailed to 850,000 people, and that has a cover and a set number of pages. So, we decided to do that and spread it out on all of the other platforms.

But there are elements of Wired taking on the issue of free speech that have been native to other platforms, like Facebook Instant conversations and Reddit AMA’s. There have been all kinds of interesting elements and add-ons that doesn’t feel as though we’re cutting a piece of meat off of the bone of the big animal. We feel like we actually made a meal for that particular platform.

Samir Husni: You’re one of the few editors of a tech magazine who still believes in print. Why?

Nick Thompson: There are a couple of reasons. Number one, because I spend a lot of time on tech, I realize its limitations. You can put out a Tweet and you can look and say that you have 10 million Twitter followers; that Tweet is going to reach 10 million people, but actually it’s not. A thousand people are going to click on it, or 200 people are going to click on it. So, there are real distribution issues on all platforms. When you think about it that way, it helps you remember that the U.S. Postal Service that will deliver 850,000 copies of these to people’s doors, or whatever the exact number is right now, is a pretty good distribution mechanism. The U.S. Postal system and the whole method of people subscribing, they get 12 issues per year, that’s really great. So, that’s one reason.

Number two is there’s something about the print magazine that’s special. It’s got the front cover, which is a way to really make a statement. It has a back cover that advertisers love. It has the capacity to package things, because the Internet breaks everything up, so the capacity to keep things together is really valuable. And advertisers see that too.

And then there’s something about the discipline of putting together a print magazine which is a useful exercise to go through for content. So, having strict limitations on the number of words that you can put in a story is actually good for the story often. Sometimes it’s nice to have unlimited words, but sometimes not having constraints leads to softness in the way you edit it or the way you think about it. Print magazines still do some really good things. My hope would be that we’ll continue to run the print magazine as long as I’m in this job, and that even if the advertising goes down in print, we’ll be able to make up for it in subscription revenue. Right now, it’s a profitable product and I think a really good product.

Samir Husni: How do you manage to create this curated, well-packaged issue, month after month, that caters to the geeks of technology and to the intellectuals of technology simultaneously?

Nick Thompson: That’s the whole challenge of this job. It’s to cater to both of them and even to people who are coming to technology for the first time. And that’s a challenge with our web content and that’s a challenge with Snapchat content; that’s a challenge with everything we do. That’s less of a print challenge than it is an overall Wired challenge. And there, we try to think of ourselves as a magazine about change, not as a magazine about tech. We think about the way technology is changing our lives; changing our world and the way that we relate to each other. Find the most interesting questions and answer them in the smartest way that we can, in whatever form is appropriate for whatever medium we’re writing for.

On the web, you want to write about things that are happening in the present; you want to write about things that are current. In print, you need to write about it in a format that will be relevant two weeks after the story closes or five weeks after the story closes, because that’s when the person actually picks up the pile of mail at the apartment they’ve been traveling from.

You have the same challenge; how do you make the story interesting for all of these different readers? And then you just have different constraints and different kinds of form based on where you’re publishing it.

Samir Husni: How would you describe the job of a magazine editor today, especially Wired? And how is it different from some years ago?

Nick Thompson: The first difference is that, obviously, we’re publishing in more different ways. And the world only gets more complicated; the job only gets more complicated; and your time only gets more disbursed, because you’re not doing a print magazine, you’re doing a print magazine and a website and all of these social platforms. So, that’s different.

But the core is kind of the same. Your job as the editor in chief is to help set a vision with your team; it’s to hire the right people, who do all of the right jobs; it’s to help people grow as writers and editors, to the extent that you can. It’s to be an ambassador, so that’s why you go to different places, like Davos, which I just returned from, to meet people; and it’s also to find really good stories, which is another reason to go to a place like Davos.

Part of my job is to sit at my desk and help move copy along and to read things and to help edit them. And then part of my job is to go out into the world and be a public face for Wired and talk to people about Wired and learn about the kind of issues we should write about. So, you have to just balance your time.

There are different kinds of editors. David Remnick, who I obviously observe very closely, spent a ton of time writing stories, editing stories, and also a ton of time promoting them, like on The New Yorker Radio Hour and on television and radio. Other people focus more on one element, like Adam Moss, who is an absolute genius at how he puts together New York magazine, but he’s not as much out there talking on television or on the radio. He’s just kind of in his office making the thing amazing. So, there are different roles. And the way I’ve chosen to do it is to do lots of things, maybe for good or for ill.

Samir Husni: During this short period since you’ve been editing Wired, can you reflect on one moment where you said to yourself, wow, this is the Wired I want?

Nick Thompson: This month has been amazing, because I think our Free Speech issue conveys exactly what I want to do with the magazine. It has five essays, all of which are awesome; they read really well together. I think it’s one of the smartest packages put together on free speech.

And free speech is something that I really don’t have a handle on. I know that the view on free speech in the tech industry has massively changed. I know that it’s complicated, but I came to it not thinking that “we need to stand up and really fight against the way the tech companies are now censoring.” Or “I really think that debate about free speech is going in the right direction.” I was very conflicted when we started this package. I felt really good that we put together an issue that had these five essays; the cover worked and the whole issue felt right. So, I felt great about that.

And then we went to the paywall and we actually hit our deadlines and the early returns are great. So, January and the first couple of days of February have been fantastic for Wired. I feel like we put out a great issue and we created a new business model, which is something I talked about my first day on the job. And it came to fruition.

Samir Husni: Is it smooth sailing then from now on?

Nick Thompson: (Laughs) I don’t think any editor in this business would think it’s smooth sailing from now on. We have to think about what comes next, so we have to make the paywall work. We’re just days in and it looks good so far, but that’s nothing. We need to make sure that we optimize and that we figure out the right ways to promote it; that we reduce friction in the subscription process; that we improve re-circulation; that we assign the right content; and that is really hard. Then we also need to figure out how to continue to diversify our revenue streams.

What we’ve done this year is try to grow advertising as much as possible. I’ve worked very carefully with our business side to understand what we do in advertising and what works. And what we can do more of; where are there opportunities for growth. But at the same time, trying to diversify. So, we started an affiliate revenue stream, where we massively expanded our efforts. If you read a review on the best headphones at Myer and you click on one and buy it, we get a small cut. And that’s useful.

Now we have three really good revenue streams, but the question is a year from now we’ll want to have diversified even more. We’ll want to have done better in all the things we do, but we’ll also want to have other revenue streams. So, what will those be? Wired has very limited audio efforts; should we go hard in that? There are a couple of other things that we’re looking at; a relatively limited conference business. We do one big event, but other publications that are similar to us do lots of events; should we do that? It’s competitive, but we could do more of that.
And then there are a whole bunch of other things that we’re thinking and talking about.

One of my big questions for next year is what’s next? From the product and engineering side of my job, we’ve had two big products. First, we moved our CMS’s (Content Management Systems) to the corporate CMS’s “Copilot,” which was a huge project and that was really the first six months of my job. Then the next six months was the paywall. So, now the product and engineering roadmap is complicated and the business roadmap is complicated.

Meanwhile, you can’t let your foot off the gas and spend so much time thinking about these things, or have your team spend so much time thinking about them, that you let the other stuff slide, and you have days where the website isn’t interesting or the magazine isn’t good. You don’t ever want that. So, that’s the challenge. It’s not like the old days where you just hire 100 new people or something. You have to do evermore within constraints, real constraints.

Samir Husni: Do you feel in your job now that you have to hop on the train and hop off the train without the train ever stopping?

Nick Thompson: (Laughs) No, I feel like the train still stops. Maybe in two years the train won’t stop and I’ll be jumping out the window.

Samir Husni: (Laughs too).

Nick Thompson: Right now it’s okay. It’s funny, because I don’t think the job of editor in chief of Wired will ever get less complicated, because you have to be in the middle of the way technology is reshaping the world, and the nature of technology is that it accelerates, because when you invent something it helps you invent the next thing. And so technology will constantly be creating, so the train only moves faster and the job only gets harder. So, ask me that in three years. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: Do you feel that you are living in a glass house now, because everybody is watching you. With all of the other entities that tried paywalls and other things like that, they weren’t talked about as much as Wired. Is it specifically because it’s Wired or because it’s Condé Nast? Why do you think that the entire media world is watching you to see if you’re going to succeed in this experiment or fail?

Nick Thompson: I don’t know. Maybe because I talk about it a lot. (Laughs) I’ve given lots of interviews about paywalls; I talk about it all of the time and I care about it a lot. I felt like my experience at The New Yorker was one of the most interesting things I’ve ever done, so I speak about it a lot and I feel good about what we did at The New Yorker. So, that probably helps a little bit.

I think the fact that it’s Wired and we’re considered to be at the forefront of technology makes a big difference. I think to some people it’s surprising. You may think that Wired would always make its information free. Though, since the very beginning Wired has talked about the value of content and whether it’s important to make people pay. And there’s a huge debate among the early Wired founders. I’m glad people are paying attention. The more attention, the better. And I hope that people subscribe. We’ll see. And if it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work, but it’s already worked. We’ve already gotten tons of new subscribers and we’re just days into it.

Samir Husni: When Wired was started it had a massive subscription price and you couldn’t even get it billed; you had to pay before you received the magazine.

Nick Thompson: When I launched the paywall, I got a note from the guy who founded the magazine saying that people should be willing to pay for the stuff that they spend their time with and value. You’re adding value to people’s lives and they should be willing to pay for it.

Samir Husni: If I showed up unexpectedly at your home one evening after work, what would I find you doing? Having a glass of wine; reading a magazine; cooking; watching TV; or something else?

Nick Thompson: You’ll find me reading magazine stories on my phone, if I’ve finished my work. I tend to go home and work; I work here, then I go home and put my kids to sleep, and I tend to go back to work, in part, because I work with a lot of people in San Francisco, so my 10:00 p.m. is their 7:00 p.m., so we’re synced up pretty well. And I tend to work until 11:00 or 11:0 p.m. And if I finish and have some time, I like to read magazine stories in other publications. And I like to play guitar.

Samir Husni: If you could have one thing tattooed upon your brain that no one would ever forget about you, what would it be?

Nick Thompson: That I actually really care about my job. I care about Wired because I think it’s really important for society to have these conversations about technology, such as free speech and technology. And I feel like Wired plays a really important civic role. So, I want them to realize that what excites me about this job and what I do isn’t just because it’s a cool job and I work in media. It’s because there’s real civic value in having this thing work and to do it well. And that’s why I try.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Nick Thompson: I don’t think any editor in chief of any publication sleeps well, with the business changes over the last few years. I worry a lot that we get stories right and I worry a lot about what comes next for us. What are the product, engineering and business choices we need to make to be sure that we can continue to produce really great journalism. So, that keeps me up at night.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

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DUN Magazine: A “DUN” Deal When It Comes To Fly Fishing Content Created For Women By Women – The Mr. Magazine™ Interview With Founder & Editor In Chief, Jen Ripple…

February 5, 2018

“I watched my children when they were younger have to do everything online, and they grew up in the digital age. And I watched my kids, specifically my two younger children, and they just loved to pick up a book. They preferred a book in their hands, and I think that was because they grew up so digitally that they needed the tactile sensation. They love the vinyl records and the Walkman, and they love books. And I thought, people who say print is dead; I love print and I know my children love print, I believe that print is never going to die.” Jen Ripple…

A Mr. Magazine™ Launch Story…

DUN Magazine is a beautifully done and well-crafted lifestyle publication about the female fly angler that is created for women by women. And that interpretation is incorporated into the magazine’s tagline and into its DNA. Jen Ripple is the founder and editor in chief of the title, which drew its first breath as a digital-only entity that seemed to be missing the one thing that would give it a heavier substance: a print component. And would also answer the cry of many of the online version’s readers of where could they buy the magazine.

I spoke with Jen recently and we talked about the many facets of DUN, from its unique name (an actual life stage of an insect that fish love to have on their menu: the mayfly) to the hefty cover price of $20 (which no one has balked at paying, according to Jen). It’s a lovely print magazine that is oversized and sticks to Jen’s own firm beliefs in conservation by using a vegetable-based ink. And while Mr. Magazine™ may not be an avid fly fisherman, I certainly applaud the determination and excellent content of the entrepreneurial endeavor.

Gearing it toward women, without excluding the male reader, Jen hopes to empower females who are interested in the sport or already ensconced in their boats and raring to go. And while she may occasionally swim upstream when it comes to some of the males in the industry of fly fishing, Jen has no intention of tearing down the scaffolds of her platform that she’s built, which strives to provide a voice for all women anglers.

Jen Ripple

So, I hope that you enjoy this “DUN” interview with a woman who gives true meaning to the words passion and entrepreneurialism – the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Jen Ripple, founder & editor in chief, DUN Magazine.

But first the sound-bites:

On the story of DUN Magazine: The story of DUN is a funny one. I was working at the University of Michigan and it was a very cold winter. I didn’t really have anything to do, so I was looking online to see what was going on, and I decided to take a fly tying class. And I took the class in a fly shop and actually loved it, so from that point forward it was like a downward spiral. I started fishing and then I started writing for a Midwest fly fishing magazine. But I really wanted to write for a women’s magazine and there wasn’t one. And that was in June 2013 and by September, we had our first magazine. I figured if I was missing it, other people were as well.

On how she chose the name of the magazine: I think picking the name for the magazine was the hardest part for me, because once you pick it you’re stuck with it, so you better like it, right? (Laughs) So, dun is the stage of a mayfly and a mayfly is one of the predominant flies that trout and bass eat, that fish in general eat. So, it made sense to have a name that was associated with fly fishing. I also wanted to pick a name that would maybe cause people who didn’t understand fly fishing to take a step back and ask, “Wait a minute, what does that mean?” Then maybe they Google it and find the magazine.

On why she decided to go against all odds when adding the print component by being oversized and having a cover price of $20: I wanted to make a magazine that people weren’t going to just page through and then toss aside. And since I’ve had the magazine, I’ve become a bit of a magazine hoarder. I just look at all magazines; I love to page through them and see the different things that I like and don’t like. And I found that the magazines I kept around were the ones that…and I don’t cook at all, but I found a cooking magazine that I really loved and I kept going back to that magazine and magazines like it, the ones that were about something that I didn’t even like, because of the way they felt, the paper quality, the print quality, the heftiness of them.

On why she geared the magazine toward women only: It’s a fly fishing magazine, so 43 percent of our readers are male in our subscriber base. But there was nothing out there for women, and I knew that women were a lot more prominent in the sport than the fishing industry knew, just because they weren’t as vocal as the male population out there. So, I just believed that women didn’t have a platform to actually prove themselves as anglers.

On whether the fish get bigger in the stories women tell as they supposedly do with “men” fishing stories: You know what, one of the covers of our magazine had a woman holding a teeny-tiny, little brook trout and I loved that because usually it’s all about the size, and that story wasn’t about the size, it was all about the experience of fly fishing. So, women don’t care what size the fish is; they don’t even care if they catch fish sometimes, because it’s about being on the river, being out side in nature and just enjoying a beautiful day. The fish is like a side story, whereas with the male population it’s more about the fish, and how big it was.

On any snags or complications she had along the way to creating the magazine: Obviously, it hasn’t been without its snags, but I think the biggest was when I started it, before our first digital magazine came out, I had a male friend of mine in the industry to say that we’d have one beautiful magazine and it would be great, but we’d never have more than one because there weren’t enough women out there who fly fish. Looking back, maybe that should have been a snag to me, but I just knew he was wrong and if nothing else, it became a springboard to prove him wrong.

On the future and what she would hope to say she had accomplished one year from now: A quarterly magazine, which is what we’re doing in 2018, and that we’ll hit our goal of 50 percent women on the water and in the fly shops and just a growing population of young and old women and children. And the fly fishing industry becoming more prevalent in fishing, in general.

On whether she received any backlash from the high cover price: Not at all. In fact, I thought I would, but I really haven’t. Everybody who picks it up just says wow, this is really a coffee table magazine that we wouldn’t get rid of. So it seemed like an appropriate price. And to be conservation-minded and print a magazine that’s conservation-minded, it’s more money. But I’ve been surprised that I haven’t had anyone balk at the cover price.

On anything she’d like to add: From the millennial generation; I watched my children when they were younger have to do everything online, and they grew up in the digital age. And I watched my kids, specifically my two younger children, and they just loved to pick up a book. They preferred a book in their hands, and I think that was because they grew up so digitally that they needed the tactile sensation. They love the vinyl records and the Walkman, and they love books. And I thought, people who say print is dead; I love print and I know my children love print, I believe that print is never going to die.

On what someone would find her doing if they showed up unexpectedly one evening at her home: At the end of the day, you’ll find me with a glass of Scotch in my hand, on my side porch, with my feet kicked up, looking over the beautiful Land Between the Lakes. My house is on 10 acres that backs up to the Land Between the Lakes, which is 180,000 acres of public land.

On what she would have tattooed upon her brain that would be there forever and no one could ever forget about her: It would be trailblazer. I want people to realize that I’ve created the home base for women in the sport. That’s what I want to be known for.

On what keeps her up at night: Having to make another magazine as beautiful as the last one. (Laughs)

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Jen Ripple, founder & editor in chief, DUN Magazine.

Samir Husni: Tell me the story of DUN Magazine.

Jen Ripple

Jen Ripple bio headshot[/caption]Jen Ripple: The story of DUN is a funny one. I was working at the University of Michigan and it was a very cold winter. I didn’t really have anything to do, so I was looking online to see what was going on, and I decided to take a fly tying class. To be really honest, I took it because it was inexpensive and I figured that if I didn’t like it after the first time, I wouldn’t go back. And I took the class in a fly shop and actually loved it, so from that point forward it was like a downward spiral.

I started fishing and then I started writing for a Midwest fly fishing magazine. But I really wanted to write for a women’s magazine and there wasn’t one. And that was in June 2013 and by September, we had our first magazine. I figured if I was missing it, other people were as well.

Samir Husni: How did you come up with the name DUN for the magazine? And why did you decide to add a print component after a few years as a digital-only entity?

Jen Ripple: I think picking the name for the magazine was the hardest part for me, because once you pick it you’re stuck with it, so you better like it, right? (Laughs) So, dun is the stage of a mayfly and a mayfly is one of the predominant flies that trout and bass eat, that fish in general eat. So, it made sense to have a name that was associated with fly fishing. I also wanted to pick a name that would maybe cause people who didn’t understand fly fishing to take a step back and ask, “Wait a minute, what does that mean?” Then maybe they Google it and find the magazine.

And when I first started, I really wanted to just be an online magazine, because five years ago people knew all about digital-online everything. And we are also very conservation-minded and I thought we’d never go to print because that’s not being conservation-minded. And I could offer it for free online and we could have a larger audience. So, we went from being four magazines a year digitally to six magazines a year digitally, to having one magazine that was 300 pages online, and that was just too much. We had so much content that everybody was asking where they could buy the magazine.

And our older demographic and our very young demographic were saying that they wanted something that they could take with them and that they could page through when they were sitting at home. Finally, after about a year and so many people asking when we were going to come out with a print magazine; I found a printer that I really liked, that was all ecofriendly and used vegetable ink, and we decided that we’d try it. And that’s why we went to print, and it’s been really good for us.

Samir Husni: Going to print, it appears you didn’t save on anything; you have a hefty, oversized magazine with over 140 pages and a $20 cover price. Why did you decide to go against all odds; a larger-sized magazine in print; a higher cover price; and quite a few pages?

Jen Ripple: I wanted to make a magazine that people weren’t going to just page through and then toss aside. And since I’ve had the magazine, I’ve become a bit of a magazine hoarder. I just look at all magazines; I love to page through them and see the different things that I like and don’t like. And I found that the magazines I kept around were the ones that…and I don’t cook at all, but I found a cooking magazine that I really loved and I kept going back to that magazine and magazines like it, the ones that were about something that I didn’t even like, because of the way they felt, the paper quality, the print quality, the heftiness of them. And I thought if I’m going to do a print magazine, I’m going to do a print magazine. (Laughs) A beautiful one that people can’t just dismiss.

And everyone who has looked at it and come to me about it has said that it is a coffee table magazine. They’ve said, “I bought this for my wife, but I love it as much as she does, because first and foremost, it’s a fly fishing magazine, but it’s also beautiful.” And that’s what I was trying to accomplish.

My background is not in magazines, so I didn’t know what I didn’t know. I just wanted to make a magazine that I would like to look through. And I didn’t know anything about the mailing, or the cost of making a magazine. (Laughs) So, I guess part of it was ignorance is bliss, you know? But I think having a background that isn’t in journalism or publishing has been good for me. It’s not without its challenges, but it’s been good for me because I can just do something that I like without having a preconceived notion about how it should be done.

Samir Husni: Why did you decide the magazine should be geared toward women only? Part of your tagline is “For Women by Women.” Why did you opt for only half of the population instead of the entire population?

Jen Ripple: It’s a fly fishing magazine, so 43 percent of our readers are male in our subscriber base. But there was nothing out there for women, and I knew that women were a lot more prominent in the sport than the fishing industry knew, just because they weren’t as vocal as the male population out there. So, I just believed that women didn’t have a platform to actually prove themselves as anglers. There are a lot of other fly fishing magazines out there, but they were all very testosterone-filled, I guess, and I knew that women had something more to offer to the industry. So, that’s why it’s women authors only, or at least, predominantly women authors.

Samir Husni: I have to ask you this question; do you hear a lot of exaggerated stories among women anglers as they say you do among men? Do the fish get bigger each time someone tells the story?

Jen Ripple: (Laughs) I love that. You know what, one of the covers of our magazine had a woman holding a teeny-tiny, little brook trout and I loved that because usually it’s all about the size, and that story wasn’t about the size, it was all about the experience of fly fishing. So, women don’t care what size the fish is; they don’t even care if they catch fish sometimes, because it’s about being on the river, being out side in nature and just enjoying a beautiful day. The fish is like a side story, whereas with the male population it’s more about the fish, and how big it was.

I used to be involved with a magazine called “A Tight Loop Magazine,” and that’s a Midwest fly fishing magazine that was 99.9 percent male authors. And I used to say that the difference between my authors at DUN and the authors at A Tight Loop was sort of like describing a baby. You know, your baby is so cute with all that hair and in that outfit; those are the female authors. The male authors were more like: my baby is bigger than your baby; my baby has more hair than your baby. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: (Laughs too).

Jen Ripple: So, that’s why I think the fish is inconsequential. Men catch many fish and sometimes more and bigger fish, but it’s not about that. And I think maybe that’s why women are such great fly anglers, because they can enjoy the whole thing. And it’s not about the fish, so they let that part go, and the fish respond to that. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: The energy in your voice as you’re talking about this magazine makes it sound as though it was as easy as a successful fly fishing excursion. Have you hit any snags or any old shoes in the water that you maybe thought were fish? Or has it been smooth sailing all the way?

Jen Ripple: Obviously, it hasn’t been without its snags, but I think the biggest was when I started it, before our first digital magazine came out, I had a male friend of mine in the industry to say that we’d have one beautiful magazine and it would be great, but we’d never have more than one because there weren’t enough women out there who fly fish. Looking back, maybe that should have been a snag to me, but I just knew he was wrong and if nothing else, it became a springboard to prove him wrong.

The women fly fishing community is so encompassing and so supportive that I think my major issue in the beginning was convincing the men in the industry, the manufacturers, that we were legitimate and that they should support us. In hindsight, I guess I got lucky in making the digital magazine first, because it didn’t really cost me much, so I didn’t need their support. And then once I could prove that women were so forefront in the industry, they were ready to put their money behind it.

Samir Husni: What are the plans for the future? If you and I are talking one year from now, what would you hope to tell me?

Jen Ripple: A quarterly magazine, which is what we’re doing in 2018, and that we’ll hit our goal of 50 percent women on the water and in the fly shops and just a growing population of young and old women and children. And the fly fishing industry becoming more prevalent in fishing, in general.

Samir Husni: When I saw the magazine on the newsstand, it jumped at me. It’s oversized, metallic ink on the cover, and a $20 cover price. Did you get any backlash from the high cover price?

Jen Ripple: Not at all. In fact, I thought I would, but I really haven’t. Everybody who picks it up just says wow, this is really a coffee table magazine that we wouldn’t get rid of. So it seemed like an appropriate price. And to be conservation-minded and print a magazine that’s conservation-minded, it’s more money. But I’ve been surprised that I haven’t had anyone balk at the cover price.

Samir Husni: Now, you call middle Tennessee home; are you originally from the South?

Jen Ripple: No, I’m from Wisconsin. I grew up in Wisconsin and lived the majority of my adult life in Chicago. I moved to Tennessee a year ago.

Samir Husni: Is there anything you’d like to add?

Jen Ripple: From the millennial generation; I watched my children when they were younger have to do everything online, and they grew up in the digital age. And I watched my kids, specifically my two younger children, and they just loved to pick up a book. They preferred a book in their hands, and I think that was because they grew up so digitally that they needed the tactile sensation. They love the vinyl records and the Walkman, and they love books. And I thought, people who say print is dead; I love print and I know my children love print, I believe that print is never going to die.

Samir Husni: If I showed up unexpectedly at your home one evening after work, what would I find you doing? Having a glass of wine; reading a magazine; cooking; watching TV; tying a fly; or something else?

Jen Ripple: At the end of the day, you’ll find me with a glass of Scotch in my hand, on my side porch, with my feet kicked up, looking over the beautiful Land Between the Lakes. My house is on 10 acres that backs up to the Land Between the Lakes, which is 180,000 acres of public land.

Samir Husni: If you could have one thing tattooed upon your brain that no one would ever forget about you, what would it be?

Jen Ripple: It would be trailblazer. I want people to realize that I’ve created the home base for women in the sport. That’s what I want to be known for.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Jen Ripple: Having to make another magazine as beautiful as the last one. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: Thank you.

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Newell Turner, Hearst Design Group Editorial Director, To Receive The University of Mississippi’s Meek School Of Journalism And New Media Highest Award: The Silver Em.

February 2, 2018

Editor’s Note: I do not use this space for press release and such, but when it is one of your former students who is honored with such an award, I am making an exception… Congratulations Newell Turner, Hearst Design Group Editorial Director.

Newell Turner, a former University of Mississippi magazine student who rose to become the Hearst Design Group editorial director, will be presented the Silver Em, the University of Mississippi’s highest award in journalism, at a campus event April 18 at 5:30 p.m.

Turner is responsible for the collective editorial direction of ELLE DECOR, House Beautiful, and Veranda magazines. He served for five years as the 22nd editor-in-chief of House Beautiful, and in 2012 under Turner’s leadership, the magazine won its first National Magazine Award for general excellence—the industry’s equivalent of an Oscar—and was a finalist in the category in 2013.

Dr. Samir Husni, professor and director of the Magazine Innovation Center, said the Silver Em is usually given to a native or resident of Mississippi who has excelled in the field of journalism and media. Turner was one of his early magazine students.

Husni said when Dorothy Kalins, then editor-in-chief of Metropolitan Home magazine, visited the Ole Miss campus in the mid-1980s, she was impressed by Turner’s passion for the magazine industry. “Newell, who was in my class, asked her a few questions that left an impact on her,” Husni said. “When she went back, she called and said, ‘Samir, I have an assistant position. I would like to offer it to Newell.’”

Husni said he encouraged Turner to take the job, saying: “If you are going to be in this profession, those opportunities don’t knock twice.” Turner took the job and eventually became editorial director of the Hearst Design Group, a leader in the publishing world with the development of innovative editorial production models and business strategies across print and digital platforms.

Turner has reported on interior design, architecture, product design and the lifestyles of upscale consumers throughout his 30-plus year career, which has included positions at House & Garden and Metropolitan Home. He was also the founding editor of Hamptons Cottages & Gardens and its sister publications: Palm Beach Cottages & Gardens and Connecticut Cottages & Gardens.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism and Southern studies with advanced work specializing in magazine design from the University of Mississippi. Turner is a current member of the American Society of Magazine Editors and a trustee on the board of the New York School of Interior Design.

The Silver Em award dates to 1958, and recipients must be Mississippians with notable journalism careers or journalists with notable careers in Mississippi.

The Wednesday, April 18, Silver Em event and dinner will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Overby Auditorium in Farley Hall on the University of Mississippi campus. It will take place during the Magazine Innovation Center’s ACT 8 Experience April 17-20. The theme of the 2018 annual magazine industry conference is Print Proud, Digital Smart.

The Meek School of Journalism and New Media was founded in 2009, funded with an endowment gift by Dr. Ed and Becky Meek. It offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in both journalism and integrated marketing communications on the Oxford campus and in coordination with satellite campuses. Because of the increasing variety of media careers, enrollment continues to rise in the Meek School, and there are now almost 1,200 undergraduate journalism and IMC majors.

CONTACTS:

Dr. Samir Husni | 662-915-1414 | samir.husni@gmail.com
Charlie Mitchell | 662-915-7146 | cdmitch1@olemiss.edu

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Two and a Half Days of Magazine and Magazine Media Bliss. An Invite to Attend the Magazine Innovation Center’s ACT 8 Experience April 17 to 19 in Oxford, Mississippi.

February 2, 2018

ACT 8 Experience is dedicated to the memory of Jennifer Reeder, VP of Sales at Democrat Printing and Lithography and a board member of the Magazine Innovation Center whose untimely death shocked all of us. May she rest in peace.

Welcome back, lovers of magazine and magazine media! I know you’ve all been lurking the blog to find out more information regarding our annual ACT Experience, the only Experience that we talk about nothing but magazines and magazine media. This year’s conference – ACT 8 Experience: Print Proud Digital Smart – is not for the faint-hearted. I can assure you we have an interesting lineup of professionals from all over the world. If you’re interested in marketing, journalism, digital or a combination of all, you need to attend this conference. It will be a wild ride of critiquing the current magazine industry and welcoming my magazine students who plan to change it for the better. Mark your calendars for April 17-19, because this will be the biggest and best ACT (Amplify, Clarify and Testify) to date.

For less than $400 you can attend and be part of this annual experience. ACT 8 Experience will be a chance for you to inspire industry leaders and future industry leaders to propel the world of magazines into a profitable future. I guarantee you will walk away with better connections and feel inspired about the magazine world outside your bubble.

This year we are welcoming several new faces including Linda Thomas Brooks, President & CEO of MPA, James Hewes, President and CEO of FIPP, the global media network based in the Untied KIngdom, Erik van Erp, Founder and Editor of Print Media News in The Netherlands, Bonnie Kintzer, President & CEO – Trusted Media Brands (formerly Reader’s Digest, and Newell Turner, Editorial Director of the Hearst Design Group.

You’ll have direct access to more than 10 editors and editorial directors, 9 presidents and CEO’s and a slew of marketers, designers and sales consultants. See the list of confirmed speakers so far at the end of this blog. A total of 33 magazine and magazine media makers sharing their knowledge and wisdom in the world of magazine and magazine media making.

Consider this a small vacation. Sit back and listen to prolific speakers tell their stories – their trials and tribulations we all rallied against to become the best writers, designers marketers and business people we could be.

Immerse yourself in the foothills of Mississippi by exploring the small but mighty town of Oxford. Take a step into southern past by strolling the streets in Clarksdale, Mississippi where the Delta Blues Museum and Morgan Freeman’s famous Ground Zero restaurant sit tucked into a humble downtown. Allow your creative juices to flow as you network with industry leaders.

I personally guarantee you will leave Oxford not only with a leg up on the industry but with a belly full of Mississippi fried catfish and an ear full of soothing, Delta blues. It’s a refreshing experience to slow down to the Mississippi pace of life. Enjoy a memorable ACT experience of learning, doing, seeing and living the Mississippi way.

Here is the link to register: http://maginnovation.org/act/register/. We only permit 100 attendees, so hop on now to reserve your spot. Join us this April for an (ACT) experience to remember!

Confirmed ACT 8 Experience Speakers (in Alpha Order) as of Feb. 1, 2018

Joseph Ballarini: Founder and Editor-in-Chief – Tail Fly Fishing magazine

Joe Berger: Publishers Marketing & Sales Consultant, Joseph Berger Associates
 
Linda Thomas Brooks: President & CEO – MPA: The Association of
Magazine Media
 
Deborah Corn: Principal, Chief Blogger, and Intergalactic Ambassador to The Printerverse™ – Print Media Centr
 
Marisa Davis: Associate Director, Product Marketing – MNI Targeted Media
 
Daniel Dejan: North American ETC (Education, Consulting and Training),
Print Creative Manager – Sappi Fine Paper
 
Jim Elliott: President – The James G. Elliott Company. 

Erik van Erp: Founder and Editor, Print Media News, The Netherlands
 
John French: Co-Founder – French LLC

Tony Frost: Senior Vice President, TVGM LLC, TV Guide

Natashia Gregoire: Reputation Manager, Editor, Access magazine – Fed Ex

Abdulsalam Haykal: Founder and Publisher, Harvard Business Review Arabic, United Arab Emirates

James Hewes: President & CEO – FIPP: The Network For Global Media
 
Mona Hidayet: Executive Director, Clients & Products – Advantage CS

Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni: Founder and Director, Magazine Innovation Center
 
Joe Hyrkin: CEO – issuu

Todd Krizelman: CEO – MEDIAradar
 
Bonnie Kintzer: President & CEO – Trusted Media Brands
 
Jerry Lynch: President – Magazine And Books, Retail Association
 
Daren Mazzucca: Vice President/Publisher – Martha Stewart Living

Mark Potts: Managing Editor – Alta The Journal of Alta California

Sebastian Raatz: Publisher/Co-founder – Centennial Media

Jen Ripple: Founder and Editor in Chief – DUN magazine

Monique de Ruiter: Former Editor Diversity magazine and VTWonen – The Netherlands

Bo Sacks: President, Precision Media Group

Ray Shaw: Executive Vice President/Managing Director – MagNet

Tony Silber: Former editor – Folio

Franska Stuy: Founder & Editor – Franska.NL, The Netherlands

John Thames: Founder & Publisher – Covey Rise Magazine
 
Newell Turner: Editorial Director – Hearst Design Group
 
Liz Vaccariello: Editor in Chief, Parents Magazine, and Content Director, Meredith Parents Network
 
Jeffrey Vitter: Chancellor – University of Mississippi
 
Thomas Whitney: President, Democrat Printing & Lithographing

Stay tuned as more speakers are added to the roster…

Don’t wait, register today. Registration is limited to the first 100 people. See you in April.

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