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Good (Make that Better) Housekeeping

April 10, 2007

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Rosemary Ellis has done some good housekeeping on the May issue of Good Housekeeping magazine. The magazine sprouts a new look and a lot of new additional departments, all in time for Mother’s Day. One of my favorite pages is the Index page. The Index page offers you Good Housekeeping’s content for that month by topic. It gives the magazine the fastest search engine available. Check the category you are interested in from Beauty & Skin Care to Food & Nutrition, to Tech and you will find the name of the article and the page number next to it. Even the recipes are divided into Sides and Salads, Main Dishes and Desserts. An easy to use approach with a lot of consideration to today’s busy woman, the magazine provides “good” information in less time and less space. The May issue of Good Housekeeping is dedicated to “all the wonderful mothers” like Rosemary’s own mother who, in Rosemary’s own words, “kept Good Housekeeping on her night table for roughly half a century, and she learned I was coming here as editor only a couple of weeks before she died.” A great Mother’s Day gift and a wonderful tribute to all the moms of the world who make our homes a better place to be.

4 comments

  1. Today i received the August issue of Good Housekeeping, which was as usual, wonderful, but I truly do wish that you would realize that there are soooo many women out here who are overweight, but no diet works…I have PCOS and at one time Atkins did wonders for me, but it no longer works. When I read these articles like the one called “Half my size, it is so hard not to just scream, since with every woman in your article, ALL she had to do was “diet and exercise”…and bigo…all was perfect!! that should be a no brainer, but it sounded like they all had compulsive eating problem, and ate incredible amounts to get that huge. In REAL life however, there are those of us who are medically obese, and yet have no problem with over eating, and many of us even exercise religiously. Sadly however, with absolutely NO RESULTS!! Your articles always focus on true over eaters, but is there anything out there for those of us who don’t fit the strereotype glutton, and yet are still overweight??


  2. Re-sending this note in it’s entirity:
    (I accidentally hit the “submit” button.

    Today I received the August issue of Good Housekeeping, which was as usual, wonderful, but I truly do wish that you would realize that there are soooo many women out here in the real world who are overweight, but for whom no diet works. I have PCOS and at one time Atkins did wonders for me, but it no longer works whatsoever. When I read these articles like the one called “Half my size”, it is so hard not to just scream, since with every woman featured in your article, it was obvious that ALL she had to do was “diet and exercise”…and bingo…all was perfect!! That should be a no brainer, but it sounded like they all had compulsive eating problem, and ate incredible amounts to get that overweight. In REAL life however, there are those of us who are medically obese, and yet have no true problem with over-eating. Many of us even exercise religiously, yet sadly for me, there are absolutely NO tangible RESULTS!! Your article’s always focus on true over eaters, but are there any answers out there for those of us who don’t fit the stereotypical glutton department, and yet are still very overweight?? I have spent months and months eating less and less, and exercising more and more, with not even one pound of weight loss to show for it!!! It’s great that those women in your article made up their minds to bite the bullet and choose a better path of health, but what if something in ones’ metabolic or genetic code, as seems to be in my case, causes a complete resistance to normal, reasonable attempts at weight loss? I was on put Prednisone (which DID NOT HELP) for a weird lung problem (Pleurisy and Pleural effusions) that I got 4 years ago, and I gained 50 pounds in 4 months!!! I had been a size 8-10 for 5 years after doing Atkins, which is the only thing that has helped at all, and I truly looked amazing for being in my 40’s, but since being on steroids, and having surgery on my lung, my hourglass figure turned into a giant, solid feeling apple shape in my mid-section, and no amount of dieting makes this awful weight even budge!! I was even tested for a pituitary tumor, but my cortisol levels were “normal”. Do you have a medical staff writer who deals with abnormal resistance to weight loss? I feel like a convicted criminal in a world that hates fat people, knowing that I never even committed the crime!! If it was just a simple matter of eating right and exercising, I’ll bet many people like me would be a lot thinner!! I have done low fat, low carbs, low calorie and had for many months increased my aerobic exercise to 3 hours a day…but still NOTHING!! Not even ONE POUND came off! All that dieting seems to do now is make my body more resistant to weight loss, and then I inevitably become depressed when no amount of courage or dedication pays off, even in the slightest. If I try to explain my plight to other people, I usually get the proverbial eye rolling and an indignant sigh that tells me they’re quietly convinced that a fat person like me would have to be parked in front of a fridge with a fork to be this overweight! Please consider looking into this weight issue in depth…you would be doing a great service to many out there who are surely in my same frustrating and hearbreaking predicament. This problem is truly the bane of my existance!

    Thank you for listening.

    A long time and loyal reader… :o)


  3. If effort equaled results, this woman would be a supermodel. I know this because she is my mother. I have seen her struggle and persist over the years, submit to myriad medical suggestions, research every possible angle of her health, throw aside conventional “wisdom” and trust her instincts, and fight onward no matter what her detractors said (I hope that I have never been in that jeering crowd); but most of all, I have seen her exemplify true womanhood. She is a wonderful compilation of imperfections, refined by a sense of humor, depth of character and matchless compassion at which I continually stand in awe. I only wish that she could see what no scale, measuring tape, or mirror could ever tell her: that she has always been beautiful, particularly in the eyes of those who love her.


  4. I have been a Good Housekeeping reader for 60 years and was very disappointed in the May issue to see that you chose M. Obama for the cover.
    No doubt she is an accomplished individual but of no interest to your readers – like that of her husband NO great achievements other that their own personal ones.
    Of all the GREAT LADIES in this country SURELY you could have found SOMEONE of more interest to all your readers.



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