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Magazine Conversations: 27 Down-to-Earth Mr. Magazine™ Conversations with Industry Leaders. A Mr. Magazine™ New Book.

June 23, 2014

Screen shot 2014-05-27 at 9.28.10 PM Magazine Conversations is the latest book from Mr. Magazine™ celebrating the magazine and magazine media industry and the people who create, edit, design and publish magazines. The first volume of Magazine Conversations include interviews with 27 leaders from the magazine industry and is published by the Magazine Innovation Center at The University of Mississippi.

“Samir’s access to industry leaders is unmatched in the marketplace,” writes Michael Simon, executive vice president for Publishers Press in his introduction to the new book. He adds, “He (Samir) can take you into the executive suite, the art departments and copy desks of new and seasoned publishers. In an environment as challenging as publishing Samir’s passion and his interviews with those who have succeeded in the face of the long odds, will provide you with ideas, and hopefully some perspectives that you haven’t considered before.”

The book contains conversations with:
Bowlers Journal’s Keith Hamilton
Business Blackbox’s Geoff Wasserman and Jordana Megonigal
Cake & Whiskey’s Megan and Mike Smith
Dinosaur’s Steven Gdula
Domino’s Beth Brenner
Dr. Oz The Good Life’s Kristine Welker
Dwell Media’s Michela O’Connor
Esquire’s David Granger
Essence’s Vanessa Bush
Fitness’ Eric Schwarzkoph
Forbes’ Randall Lane
Good Housekeeping’s Rosemary Ellis and Pat Haegele
InStyle’s Ariel Foxman
Kuier’s (South Africa) Kay Karriem
Live Happy’s Karol DeWulf Nickell
Lose It!’s (South Africa) Suzy Brokensha
Men’s Health’s Ronan Gardiner and Bill Phillips
Naked Food’s Margarita Restrepo and Peter Walsh
Newsweek’s Etienne Uzac and Jim Impoco
Parade’ Maggie Murphy and Jack Haire
The Pitchfork Review’s Chris Kaskie
Politico’s Susan Glasser
Redbook’s Jill Herzig and Mary Morgan
The Saturday Evening Post’s Steve Slon
TIME’s Nancy Gibbs
World Wildlife’s Alex Maclennan

Magazine Conversations is available for a $50.00 donations payable to the Magazine Innovation Center at The University of Mississippi. Send a check or money order payable to the Magazine Innovation Center at 114 Farley Hall, Meek School of Journalism and New Media, University, MS 38677. Magazine Conversations is published by the Magazine Innovation Center and is printed and sponsored by Publishers Press.

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Robyn Peterson Reveals the Secret Sauce that Makes Mashable Thrive and Survive. The Mr. Magazine™ Interview.

June 20, 2014

“I think the secret sauce for a digital publishing company to survive is to try and reinvent the game.” Robyn Peterson, Chief Technology Officer, Mashable

robyn peterson 2 Tech start-ups and media companies; and never the two shall part, at least, not at Mashable where CTO Robyn Peterson has done some amazing things with the marriage of the duo. After leading the development of the new Mashable.com in 2012, which saw a 100% increase in mobile page views, pages-per-visit and ad engagement, and the development of Velocity, a technology that predicts and measures audience response of content across the web, Robyn is a force to be reckoned with when it comes to digital publishing and how to make it more accountable and successful.

I spoke with Robyn recently during a visit to Lisbon, Portugal where the two of us were keynote speakers at the WoodWing Xperience. Our conversation was about Mashable, the Velocity Platform and digital publishing in general. My main questions related to how to make digital much more than just a click of the mouse and bring engagement and connection to the audience. I even asked him if Mashable is going to follow other digital platforms that discovered print as a new outlet to their digital sites.

So sit back and discover Robyn Peterson’s answers in this lively Mr. Magazine™ conversation with Mashable’s Chief Technology Officer.

But first a Mr. Magazine™ minute with Robyn Peterson, CTO, Mashable on what makes a digital platform survive and thrive in today’s marketplace.

And now the sound-bites…

On why it’s hard for legacy media to achieve and do what some digital-only companies have done in the media world: I think to really excel on the digital side you have to really operate aggressively. You need to be OK with risk and really take some chances. It’s a different mindset.

On any similarities between legendary risk-taking journalism of yesterday and today’s digital entities: I would say there is something in common with companies that risked it all to succeed. And when you’re a digital-only company trying to make it in digital, you need that to survive; you need that success or you go away.

On the DNA that makes up Mashable: I would say the real secret to Mashable is that we listen to our readers as much as we talk to them and we have even from the very beginning.

On how the Velocity Platform works: The Velocity Platform is a platform that predicts the viral potential of a piece of content. It will watch a particular piece of content and listen across social networks and try to get a good figure of how viral a piece of content will become.

On his most challenging moment at Mashable: I would say it was actually developing this Velocity Platform. I’ve been in the media business and text startups before and it was fun to really merge those two pieces of my identity together.

On the secret sauce of Mashable’s digital staying power: I think the secret sauce for a digital publishing company to survive is to try and reinvent the game.

On what keeps him up at night: I would say that one thing we believe strongly in is that you need to make big bets. And in order to really get ahead of market, those big bets have to pay off at some percentage.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Robyn Petrson, Chief Technology Officer, Mashable…

Samir Husni: You’ve been involved with Mashable now for over three years; why do you think it’s so hard for legacy media to achieve and do what digital-only companies have been doing in our media world?

robyn peterson1 Robyn Peterson: I think to really excel on the digital side you have to really operate aggressively. You need to be OK with risk and really take some chances. And when you talk about legacy media, I’d have to assume you’re talking about companies that have been doing what they’ve been doing quite successfully for many years, but it’s been a very similar recipe. And the digital world requires a completely different mindset.

You really need to think about how your brand adapts to a different use case; a use case where your readers don’t come to you or you don’t go to your readers once a month or once a week. Your readers will actually come to you and you want them to come to you on a very regular basis, many times a day is ideal.

To get to that place, you need to rethink who you are. You need to step back to the core of your brand and say: OK, in print I publish this much and this is the use case whether I’m once a month and I want to be on coffee tables and be that flag of identity which helps so many brands or I now want to be the place that everyone goes to or this target market goes to in order to get XY and Z. It’s a different mindset.

Samir Husni: What’s amazing to me is if you look at the early 20th century and all the journalists who started magazines, they were risk takers and when they had an idea for a new magazine they weren’t thinking about the statistical analysis of that product or the money. Whether it was Henry Luce or DeWitt Wallace, they were journalists first and businessmen later. Do you see that there are any similarities between the new digital entities today and the historical others?

Robyn Peterson: I have to profess, first of all, that I’m not an expert on some of the earlier publishing history. But I would say there is something in common with companies that risked it all to succeed. And when you’re a digital-only company trying to make it in digital, you need that to survive; you need that success or you go away. And a lot of us like our jobs and don’t want them to go away.

When you’re in an existing business and trying to branch into a new business, it’s hard to have that level of aggression, for lack of a better word, the ability to take a risk. And in a new start-up, you need to take that risk in order to survive. And there’s no safety in staying still or in being conservative.

Samir Husni: Can you define the DNA of Mashable?

Robyn Peterson: I would say the real secret to Mashable is that we listen to our readers as much as we talk to them and we have even from the very beginning. When Peter Cashmore first started the blog, he was constantly on social networks like Twitter listening to how people were reacting to what he was saying or what other people were saying that they wanted to see written about. So he was always listening.

And as Mashable grew from a blog to a media company over the last few years, I would say that we’ve just accelerated that and continued to listen to what our readers are saying. And by doing that we’ve managed to build an audience of people that like to share. They share with us and more importantly than that, they share with each other and with new people who haven’t heard about us.

So I guess if you sort of dial back to what is Mashable’s DNA; it’s listening and talking to a connected audience.

Samir Husni: So you don’t think in those early stages that Pete Cashmore (Mashable founder and CEO) was sitting around looking at statistical analyses and seeing how much money he was going to make developing this blog?

Robyn Peterson: No, not then, although we are now. We run a lot of data stats out of Mashable. Within my engineering team I have an artificial intelligence team and a data science team, both of which are working on our Velocity Platform.

Samir Husni: Tell me a little bit more about the Velocity Platform and how you’re actually able to monetize digital?

Robyn Peterson: Sure. The Velocity Platform is a platform that predicts the viral potential of a piece of content. It will watch a particular piece of content and listen across social networks and try to get a good figure of how viral a piece of content will become. We’ll take all the data we get from listening and plug it through statistical models and make predictions some number of hours out.

And what that helps us to do is figure out which content is winners and the ones that we’ll want to promote more highly and aggressively. We’ve used the Velocity System internally for about a year.

robyn peterson 2 Internally, we use it for a couple of different things. First, we’ve created an intelligence dashboard that our editorial team can look at and at any given second they can find out either the viral potential of our content, content that we’ve published, or the viral potential of content that’s out there at large on the Internet. And then that way they can make a decision on themes they want to cover.

Mashable.com itself has a large component of Velocity built into it. The System makes recommendations and moves content around dynamically; makes recommendations to editors who manage our home page and the editors can then decide which pieces of content to highlight in top positions and the algorithm can manage the rest of the page. The algorithm can manage the right side of articles and what comes below articles. And once again, it helps us promote the stories that are our winners.

We also use the Velocity Platform to inform our marketing team as to which pieces of content should be discussed on social networks, Facebook for instance. With social networks and a story, timing is critical. So knowing which piece of content to promote and exactly when to promote it is something that’s really critical knowledge for our marketing team and that’s what Velocity internally provides to them.

With this announcement that we’re partnering with 360i and giving them exclusive access to Velocity, we’re going to start exploring how Velocity can help an agency, especially an agency that’s so good at social already for the brands that are in their portfolio, from Oreo to HBO and many others; it’ll be interesting to see how our use cases apply to 360i and we’ll see how that evolves as our partnership goes on.

Samir Husni: As you were talking about this I was thinking why can’t the print magazine business have some kind of Velocity Platform to predict things about their covers? Like which ones will go viral? In this digital age; is it possible for print to learn from some of these techniques?

Robyn Peterson: It’s an interesting idea. To be honest, I haven’t thought about it before. If there’s data to collect, there’s velocity to be observed and predicted. If those components are there then there’s a recipe for print as well.

Samir Husni: What has been the most challenging moment in your career with Mashable?

Robyn Peterson: That’s a really good question. I would say it was actually developing this Velocity Platform. I’ve been in the media business and text startups before and it was fun to really merge those two pieces of my identity together, to try and evolve into this media company/technology company hybrid that Mashable is today.

And I think just the evolution of that created some challenges, but of course a lot of positives too. Then with respect to Velocity itself being the result of that sort of evolution, or one of the results, we didn’t know what we built with Velocity would be possible. We thought it would be in our heart of hearts. We thought we could predict, but we weren’t a 100% sure it would be as good as it is, let’s put it that way.

We spent some time developing out a proof of concept and got it out there and sure enough it actually worked and that was a pretty thrilling moment.

Samir Husni: And was that the most pleasant moment in your job?

Robyn Peterson: That was. It was a very fun moment, although we have a lot of exciting stuff in store for the next few years. I hope we beat that.

Samir Husni: Is there a recipe that can be duplicated from Mashable? We have some out there like Huffington Post, Media Post and others; is there some kind of secret ingredient that goes into all of these companies that are surviving? I think the death rate on digital is even higher than print, in terms of how many companies have started and are now gone. What’s the secret sauce?

Robyn Peterson: I think the secret sauce for a digital publishing company to survive is to try and reinvent the game. So it’s not to be exactly how the print media companies are bringing publishing to the web, but to actually step back and say: How should I create this digital business; what’s at the heart of my brand? A – what is my brand? B – what kind of operating model fits my brand? And then to execute on that plan.

For us at Mashable, we’re such a social company that if we were to follow classic media rules we wouldn’t have tried to develop a lot of product expertise in house, we wouldn’t have tried to build out an artificial intelligence team and a data science team and all those sorts of things to build platforms that listen and predict social behavior.

We stepped back and kind of flushed all the old media history out of our minds and asked: How can we do this differently? If we’re starting right now from scratch, and again that’s important for any company, to try and reinvent itself and we did that, I believe, at Mashable a couple years back, we feel like we’re a new company. How should we actually attack this problem and come to a solution? For us the thought was let’s build this technical expertise, this product expertise in house and A – not leave all the fun to the tech startups, but B – create something that’s completely differentiated and although it doesn’t fit nicely into this is just a media company or this is just a tech company, it’s a hybrid between those two, but it’s really shown great results for us.

Samir Husni: Can you imagine a mix between innovation and renovation or it must be all innovation?

Robyn Peterson: I guess to some degree innovation brings renovation, doesn’t it? If you’re trying to do something new, you have to mold the existing organization to fit that. So I think one brings the other.

Samir Husni: Any other words of wisdom?

Robyn Peterson: For media companies in particular, think about how you’re utilizing your technology team. In too many media companies, the technology team have been relegated to simply being assigned tickets and executing on those tickets and not really having a seat at the table to decide the strategy of the company.

And that’s where new media companies or digital-only media companies have a leg-up on some of the existing companies that made it to their prime during the print era; not that we’re out of the print era by any means. I think digital-only companies recognize the importance of technology and digital product and things that go along with that like user experience. And it’s so critical to not only keep that in mind, but to have the folks who actually run those groups at the table deciding where to go next. Because when you’re in a world dominated by engineering and technology, you need an engineer and a technologist at the table when you’re deciding where to go.

Samir Husni: Do you think there will ever be a print magazine from Mashable?

Robyn Peterson: I’m not sure. We have no imminent plans to launch one, I’ll say that.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Robyn Peterson: Too much caffeine. It’s a great question and I would say that one thing we believe strongly in is that you need to make big bets. And in order to really get ahead of market, those big bets have to pay off at some percentage. And I guess when you’re making big bets; sometimes you can lose some sleep over them. But when they pay off it’s fun. And I feel like a lot of our big bets have been paying off lately.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

© Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved.
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Rights to excerpts and links to the blog are hereby permitted with proper credit. Copying the entire blog is NOT permitted and is a violation of the copyright laws.

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Teen Vogue: More Vogue and Less Teen. VP & Publisher Jason Wagenheim Shares With Mr. Magazine™ The Secrets Behind The Magazine’s Survival. The Mr. Magazine™ Interview.

June 18, 2014

“There’s something people like, whether you’re fifteen or fifty, about the printed product. You don’t have to charge it, no worries if it gets sandy or wet at the beach; you don’t panic if you leave it on a plane and that’s not changing. I don’t think digital will ever fully replace that.” Jason Wagenheim

JasonHeadshotJason Wagenheim has been Publisher of Teen Vogue for just over two years and has already made a tremendous impact on the magazine. In 2012, he transformed the Back-to-School shopping experience with the debut of a new national shopping holiday, Teen Vogue Back-to-School Saturday that has become a unique experience for students during that busy time of the year. He calls it Teen Vogue’s Super Bowl.

An apt description for an idea from the man who has seen record-breaking ad page growth, market share wins and new business and shows no signs of slowing down. In 2013, Teen Vogue marked the largest August and September issues in 5 years and Teen saw +9% in ad pages through the September issue.

I spoke with Jason recently about his perspective on why Teen Vogue withstood the test of time and economics when others, like CosmoGirl and Ellegirl weren’t quite so fortunate. His answers are spot on and very informative.

So sit back, relax and enjoy the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Vice-President and Publisher of Teen Vogue – Jason Wagenheim.

But first the sound-bites…

On his secret for why Teen Vogue outlasted most of the other teen titles:
Overall we survived because we maintained our relevancy. When we launched this magazine 11 years ago, it was 2003, we had this perception that there wasn’t a young fashion magazine out there.

On the idea that teens don’t read print anymore, only digital: Fashion and beauty magazines still work really well in print, even if you’re fifteen-years-old or fifty; our category is thriving from an audience perspective.

On whether he anticipates any changes during the next three years for the magazine:
A lot is changing and it’s changing very quickly. I think our biggest opportunity is to continue to evolve like we have the last 11 years.

On his biggest stumbling block since coming to Teen Vogue:
The hardest thing in general has been this economic climate that we’re in. There’s a lot less out there and a lot more people going for it.

On whether he believes the brand can exist without print:
I don’t think so. I think the mix of our audience and how they come to Teen Vogue in five years might look totally different.

On his most pleasant surprise:
I think it’s the relationship we have with our audience. Our median age is actually twenty-four-years-old and they’ve grown up with us.

On adding events to the Teen Vogue mix, such as Back to School Saturday:
We simply decided and declared that we were going to have August 11, 2012 to be the first-ever back to school Saturday. That was it. We just went out and told everybody we were putting all of our resources behind this day.

On what keeps him up at night:
I do lie in bed thinking about what are the things that I’m going to do that next day or during that week that is going to get me business right now, keep me healthy and profitable and contributing to Condè Nast.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ conversation with Jason Wagenheim, Vice-President and Publisher, Teen Vogue…

Samir Husni: Ten or fifteen years ago, teen magazines were rediscovered. Titles such as Teen People, Cosmo Girl, Elle Girl and Teen Vogue to name a few; however your magazine ended up being the sole survivor from the group. What’s your secret? What kept Teen Vogue going when the other magazines, including Teen People that had an even larger circulation, all vanished?

Picture 17 Jason Wagenheim: Overall we survived because we maintained our relevancy. When we launched this magazine 11 years ago, it was 2003, we had this perception that there wasn’t a young fashion magazine out there. Not a teen magazine, but a magazine that was the youngest fashion title. And that’s what we set out to do and 11 years later that’s what we’ve really accomplished. We’ve owned this position as being the youngest fashion magazine and not just being teen.

We have stellar edit, a killer product that Amy Astley puts out every month and on top of that we’ve really been able to take advantage of being only 11 years old and growing up in this age of digital, social and now mobile and capitalizing on that without having to adapt. We’ve grown up at the same time that our readers have with all of this new technology.

So we’re using those other platforms to drive relevancy back to our print product and it’s working really well.

Samir Husni: I assume since you are still a print product that you didn’t subscribe to the same mantra those other three teen magazines did: that teens don’t read anymore, they are always on their digital devices so let’s fold the print and stick to digital?

Jason Wagenheim: Not at all. And I think a lot of it has to do with our category in particular. Fashion and beauty magazines still work really well in print, even if you’re fifteen-years-old or fifty; our category is thriving from an audience perspective.

We were up 39 percent in total audience with the Fall MRI numbers. We just posted a six percent gain in total audience with the Spring release this week and teens are reading magazines in the fashion and beauty space. We’re doing really well.

I think that every time somebody texts, posts or tweets a story from our product and our brand, that’s a new audience development opportunity for us that we didn’t have ten years ago. So we’ve really tried to capitalize on that.

I think also that there’s something about print that’s very tangible in the fashion and beauty space; it’s very engaging, big, pretty pictures of clothes and beauty products and great looks still sell product. And marketers know that and audiences know that.

Samir Husni: You were one of the early adapters in the United States for the Teen Vogue size, which was originated by Glamour in the U.K. and now is all over. Is this still working? You are still unique in that space.

Jason Wagenheim: Yes, coincidentally it’s the same size as the iPad seven or eight years later. The format does work, girls love it, they can carry it around like a textbook or it fits in their backpack or nicely in their purse. We’ve always had this size long before the iPad and it continues to work really well for us.

Samir Husni: If we’re having this conversation three years from now; do you think anything will have changed?

Jason Wagenheim: A lot is changing and it’s changing very quickly. I think our biggest opportunity is to continue to evolve like we have the last 11 years. We have to constantly be challenging ourselves to think outside of our core product in print and invent new innovate with social, mobile and video products that we can connect our audiences and marketers together like we have.

We have a really big social footprint. We’ve continued to double-down on our efforts to grow our social strategy. We’re growing Teen Vogue.com, we’ve doubled our traffic in the last year, and we’ve also doubled revenue. We’ve launched video, really great video product and I think that you’ll see all of these things become part of continuing to be a factor in this Teen Vogue eco-system that’s rooted in print, but lives in all these other places.

Samir Husni: What do you think is the relevancy of the Mother Ship – Vogue Magazine – and its position in the marketplace?

Jason Wagenheim: I think it’s the most important fashion magazine that’s ever been and is the total arbiter of fashion magazines. It’s the category leader; there’s no doubt. They will continue to have that position and they also evolve and live in these other places like social, mobile and digital. They launched an Instagram commerce strategy this week that’s gotten a lot of nice pickup for them.

That is the game right now, to constantly be reinventing yourself. And those brands that do will survive.

Samir Husni: When you were offered the job of publisher of Teen Vogue a little over two years ago, what was the first thing that came to your mind?

Picture 18 Jason Wagenheim: I was coming from Glamour and I was talking about what a great opportunity it was with Anna Wintour and Amy Astley and we’d been talking about how much untapped opportunity there was with Teen Vogue and how much potential it had to grow, because the combination of brand DNA and the audience was a really powerful one. Teens and millennials were and are driving the whole conversation. And a lot of it was just really around the opportunity to take this thing to new levels.

Samir Husni: What has been your biggest stumbling block since taking the job?

Jason Wagenheim: The hardest thing in general has been this economic climate that we’re in. There’s a lot less out there and a lot more people going for it. Our competitors now aren’t just other teen or fashion magazines, we’re competing with a lot of the Pure-Play digital sites, broadcast networks, radio, outdoor and a lot of new start-ups that are out there vying for advertising dollars and it’s hard to sort through what’s really good and what’s going to work in the long term.

Marketers are enamored of a lot of the new stuff out there, so our biggest challenge has just been maintaining our share. And we’re doing it. We’ve had nice growth in our digital and social and mobile revenue. And we’re holding onto print as best we can.

Samir Husni: Do you think the brand can exist without print?

Jason Wagenheim: I don’t think so. I think the mix of our audience and how they come to Teen Vogue in five years might look totally different. My challenge now in the near-term is protecting my core product in print which still makes up a lot of our revenue, overwhelmingly so and growing and scaling those other parts of my business. I’d like to see more of a balance and when that happens I think the print product will always be the root of our overall business.

There’s something people like, whether you’re fifteen or fifty, about the printed product. You don’t have to charge it, no worries if it gets sandy or wet at the beach; you don’t panic if you leave it on a plane and that’s not changing. I don’t think digital will ever fully replace that.

Samir Husni: What has been your most pleasant surprise so far in your job at Teen Vogue?

Jason Wagenheim: I think it’s the relationship we have with our audience. Our median age is actually twenty-four-years-old and they’ve grown up with us. We’ve actually aged-up over the last few years. And our audience has aged-up right along with us. They’re young, smart and so credible; they have more influence than any generation prior has ever had with what they have in the palms of their hands, their devices in particular.

And their relationship with Teen Vogue is so strong and so credible; it’s very different than a woman in her thirties or forties who has sort of been-there-done-that-seen-that a million times. They still have hope in their eyes and believe that they can take over the world and that’s a really powerful place for us to be in, being they’re big sister and mentor as they’re growing up.

Samir Husni: With the median age as twenty-four; when do you think they grow up from that teen mentality and say, “OK, now I can move to Vogue.”

Jason Wagenheim: I think that they’re starting to read Vogue certainly earlier too; it’s a very sophisticated fashion customer that both of our brands have. What Teen Vogue has done really well is mix the highs and lows. A woman’s first experience with luxury is not a $15,000 couture dress; it is a $300 pair of sunglasses from Gucci or a $500 pair of shoes from Prada or maybe it’s even a lipstick for $30 from Chanel. That’s how they enter luxury.

What Teen Vogue does great and what separates us is we mix high and low really well together. It’s OK to wear H&M, Gap and the Topshop and mix it with that Chanel lipstick and that Gucci pair of sunglasses. That’s always been our secret sauce and that has been what has separated us from many of the other fashion brands.

It’s also what’s been able to keep us healthy and relevant because it’s very real and how young women shop.

Samir Husni: When you look at the marketplace now, and the only other teen magazine still out there is Seventeen; do you use that as a competitive set or you don’t really consider them a competitor to Teen Vogue?

Jason Wagenheim: No. There are only a very small handful of mass beauty advertisers where we are really competing for the same business. If you look at our mix of business, we have a much stronger mix of retail, fashion, jewelry and accessories advertising. We’ve also done a great job of growing some of our non-endemic businesses and the stuff we’re competing for is really coming from the person targeting the fifteen and sixteen-year-old from a mass market perspective.

The good news is there are only two of us in town when it comes to that particular part of our business, so we both fare pretty well with those brands.

Samir Husni: You’re adding events to the mix; can you tell me a little bit more about this?

Jason Wagenheim: This is a great example of when I talked about evolution. We saw that the back-to-school space in 2012 when I started here was wide open for an experiential event-based holiday, similar to a Black Friday or even a Fashion’s Night Out, which the Mother Ship Vogue created several years ago. There was no rallying moment or galvanizing moment, I should say, for teens and college-aged kids to shop and for going back to school.

So we created a day. We simply decided and declared that we were going to have August 11, 2012 to be the first-ever back to school Saturday. That was it. We just went out and told everybody we were putting all of our resources behind this day. And if you put promotions and offers and gifts-toward-purchases and you had great social and digital strategy against this day, together we will get people shopping. And we did. In the first year we had about 60 malls participate and in the second year we had 130, this year we’ll have more than 100 through our relationship with Simon Malls and we’ve expanded it to be four Saturdays starting August 9th and rolling through the Labor Day weekend. Forty-five different brands participate in the fashion and beauty space. And it’s really our moment that we very uniquely own. There’s no other brand that can create such a galvanizing moment during the back to school season. It’s our Super Bowl.

Samir Husni: What advice would you give a newcomer to the field?

Jason Wagenheim: Be extremely well-rounded. First and foremost, no matter what side of the business you’re on, either the business or the edit side, there’s something happening where kids are coming out of school now and they’re not paying enough attention to how they write and communicate in business. And I would tell them to really hone their communication skills. And work hard at that.

The second thing is to be really well-rounded and understand that we do not live in a myopic world where it’s just magazines or just TV or just radio; you have to know everything. When you’re producing content now you have to think about the implications across every different platform and know that what you do in print is very different than what you do on the web, or on social, but how are you going to tell that same story to those different platforms in the most relevant way.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Jason Wagenheim: I do lie in bed thinking about what are the things that I’m going to do that next day or during that week that is going to get me business right now, keep me healthy and profitable and contributing to Condè Nast, but also what are the things that I should be doing this week that will keep me evolving so that in three years’ time my business continues to be as healthy as it is now. And that’s what I think about. I don’t think you can look beyond three years, but there are things we are doing and putting into place, strategies that take years to implement and recognize the fruits of and those are the things that keep me up at night.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

© Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved.
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Rights to excerpts and links to the blog are hereby permitted with proper credit. Copying the entire blog is NOT permitted and is a violation of the copyright laws.

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Single Copies At the Check-Out and the Mid-Level Publishers: A Solution to a Major Dilemma. A Mr. Magazine™ MagNet Exclusive

June 16, 2014

Picture 10 In my continuous exclusive analysis with MagNet’s Luke Magerko, this week we focus on checkout acquisition for the mid-level publisher. Last time, we discussed AAM sales results and checkout disparity and received a thoughtful response from an industry veteran and friend to this blog. This is an excerpt of the response:

“I believe you have seriously underestimated what’s required to play at the checkout. Very few titles have the financial where-with-all to purchase checkout racks (where upfront money is a requirement) or support the needed merchandising services. The checkout is only for magazines with broad consumer appeal and nearly always with a female orientation. Relatively low cover pricing is also required to feed the impulse nature of the purchase and help support multiple purchases”

LUKE, THESE ARE ALL REASONABLE CONCERNS. HOW DO YOU RESPOND TO THIS?

Let’s walk through each point of the article and address them one at a time.

READER SAYS: “Very few titles have the financial where-with-all to purchase checkout racks (where upfront money is a requirement) or support the needed merchandising services.”

This was true many years ago when smaller publishers represented only one or two titles, retail prices were low, and existing checkout titles were highly competitive (selling at high efficiencies).

checkout1 MagNet identified the top 25 publishers at newsstand based on retail sales. These publishers represent 75 percent of all retail sales however but many of these publishers have opportunities to expand their presence further.

Specifically, six of these 25 publishers have little to no checkout exposure. These publishers produce high-priced, high-quality products that generate significant profit for all parts of the supply chain but are underrepresented at checkout.

SO WHY CAN THESE PUBLISHERS NOT MAKE IT TO CHECKOUT?
These publishers have been told they could not afford checkout space but also there are no checkout pockets available. Existing checkout publishers have an advantage as they own the space and defend it though such programs as Pay-to-Stay.

READER SAYS: “The checkout is only for magazines with broad consumer appeal and nearly always with a female orientation.”

At the MPA Retail Conference held last week, Steve French of the Natural Marketing Institute indicated nearly 30% of all shoppers are male*. The purely female-driven shopping experience is changing and the publishing industry must catch up.

cosmowal We now live in a time where “broad consumer appeal” is not an efficient use of space. The newsstand needs micro-marketed checkouts at the store level, not just a broad coalition of fifty magazines displayed at every store in the United States. We will discuss this micro-marketing at a later date.

READER SAYS: “Relatively low cover pricing is also required to feed the impulse nature of the purchase and help support multiple purchases”

People Magazine now retails at $4.99 and the national weighted cover price is close to $6.00. Time Inc, Meredith and some other publishers have made an extraordinary profit at checkout producing higher-priced, niche titles.

SO HOW DO THESE MID-LEVEL PUBLISHERS ACQUIRE CHECKOUT AND WHAT DO SMALLER NICHE TITLE DO TO JOIN IN?
Publishers but publishers of multiple titles can afford checkout space and should “pack” a checkout pocket like larger publishers; that is rotate as many releases through the checkout pocket as possible.

BUT WON’T ROTATING TITLES THROUGH A CHECKOUT REDUCE ON SALE TIME IN STORE?
Yes, but the consensus from larger publishers is this is acceptable. Here’s why: this is an example of scanned unit sales by week for a top-200 monthly title. Next to the sales, we added four labels using the terms created by the renowned statistician Frank Bass in 1969**.

Screen shot 2014-06-15 at 3.23.50 PM

A consumer makes multiple shopping visits a week so we conclude the consumer will have seen a monthly magazine multiple times in in one month. At some point, the consumer will ignore the issue as they have purchased it (“early adopters”) or decided not to purchase it weeks earlier. By week four, sales drop dramatically when “laggards” finally purchase the product.

Let’s look what would happen if this publisher added five additional issues to the checkout rotation, reducing on-sale time from four weeks to three weeks.

Screen shot 2014-06-15 at 3.25.25 PM

New issues will reengage the early adopters and increase sales in what was week four of the previous issue. This example suggests that week four sales increases from 625 (laggards in chart #1) to 2,200. In this example, that works out to a 252 percent sales increase for the week.

SO AN INDIVIDUAL ISSUE MAY LOSE SALES BUT OVERALL THE SALES INCREASE?
Yes, the publisher loses approximately 8 percent of issue sales but will increase overall sales by 31 percent.

WHICH TITLES AND HOW MANY SHOULD ROTATE THROUGH A CHECKOUT POCKET?
I defer to the publisher on which titles to rotate but the publisher must select their rotation schedule using the same scan data I used above.

IS THERE ANY WAY TO MAKE THIS WORK FOR A SMALLER PUBLISHER?
Yes, we will discuss how a smaller publisher could get into checkout but it is more complicated than a short blurb here.

IF YOU WERE ONE OF THESE POWERFUL BUT UNDERREPRESENTED PUBLISHERS, WHAT WOULD BE THE NEXT STEPS?
• Analyze the data. Make a list of profitable, impactful accounts that might be worthy of pursuit.
• Create a rotation schedule of titles that make sense for these chains.
• Create a P/L on a checkout pocket. Again, please contact MagNet to help with this.
• Present this plan to wholesalers representing these chains and determine when the next line review is scheduled.
• Prepare to meet with the retailer if at all possible.

THANK YOU LUKE FOR THE RECOMMENDATIONS AND THANK YOU READER THE COMMENTS. WE HOPE WE ADDRESSED YOUR POINTS. WE ALWAYS LOOK FOR READER RESPONSE AS IT HELPS US CLARIFY CONTENTIOUS POINTS BUT ALSO LEADS TO A BETTER CONVERSATION. THE INDUSTRY IS CHANGING RAPIDLY, PLEASE JOIN US IN MAKING IT A STRONGER!

—————————————————————————————
* Steve French and Natural Marketing Institute can be found at http://www.nmisolutions.com/

** Frank Bass is the author of the Bass Diffusion Model which presents a rationale how current adopters and potential adopters of a new product interact.
__________________________________________________________________________________________
© Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved.
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Rights to excerpts and links to the blog are hereby permitted with proper credit. Copying the entire blog is NOT permitted and is a violation of the copyright laws.

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John Puterbaugh, CEO, Nellymoser: Mobile Is The Best Amplifier of Print. The Mr. Magazine™ Minute

June 16, 2014

John Puterbaugh,Ph.D., founder and CEO of Nellymoser, the company that specializes in mobile computing, shares with Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni his views on why mobile is the best amplifier of traditional media in this Mr. Magazine™ Minute.

© Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved.
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Rights to excerpts and links to the blog are hereby permitted with proper credit. Copying the entire blog is NOT permitted and is a violation of the copyright laws.

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Greg Sullivan and AFAR Magazine: Five Years of Going Against The Odds And Making It In The Print Business – The Mr. Magazine™ Interview With Co-Founder And CEO – Afar Media.

June 13, 2014

“Print is coming back. It has credibility and it’s deeper; it just has so many attributes to it that the digital world lacks.” Greg Sullivan

BW Passionate, caring and extremely open about what it takes to keep a travel magazine growing and sincerely true to its mission and brand; Greg Sullivan – Co-Founder and CEO, Afar Media – talks about the wild and challenging ride of Afar Magazine over the last five years and how “far” (pun intended) they’ve come.

From the ink on paper magazine to the nonprofit foundation, Learning AFAR, which provides scholarships to lower-income high school students to go on life changing trips and another division, AFAR Experiences, that puts on travel events; the man and his mission stays focused on what’s important to himself and his vision: making travel make a positive difference in people’s lives.

No matter where you’d like to go in your mind’s eye, the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Greg Sullivan should be able to take you there – so pull up your favorite chair, grab your drink of choice and get ready to go Afar as you enjoy Mr. Magazine™ and Greg Sullivan’s animated and passionate conversation…

But first the sound-bites:

On the five year journey of Afar Magazine: Well, it has been a wild ride. It’s been fun and it’s definitely been challenging. In particular, those first couple of years were tough.

On his most pleasant surprise over the last five years: There have been a couple of pleasant surprises. One was the receptivity that Afar had, just in general. There was certainly some degree of skepticism, but there was also a lot of wow, this is great, how can I help and we love not only the fact that you’re doing it, but we love what you’re doing.

On his biggest stumbling block: The biggest stumbling block was just breaking through the whole credibility thing.

On whether having no magazine experience was an advantage or a disadvantage to him: Both. If I’d had the experience, in my opinion, I probably wouldn’t have done it.

On how the non-profit Foundation and the program Learning AFAR is going: We’ve sent over 300 students, basically we’ve been sending 50 or 60 kids every summer from all over to places like Peru, Cambodia, China and Mexico; just amazing trips and these kids are coming back and they have you in tears as they tell you about the effects these trips have on them.

On the advice he would give to someone starting a new magazine today: Well, it’s not for the faint of heart. First of all, it takes cash. And it takes a lot of work.

On what role he believes print plays in today’s digital world: Print is coming back. Three years ago, people didn’t even like to talk about print and now you’re seeing more and more people going to print again.

On what keeps him up at night: What I think about in the middle of the night is execution issues; how are we delivering on all of our promises every day.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ conversation with Greg Sullivan, Co-Founder and CEO, Afar Media…

Samir Husni: Afar is still going strong after five years; tell me about this five year journey from that launch party where I first met you in August 2009, when you were just beginning a magazine during one of the worst economic times in the industry, until today.

AFE0614_COVER_RGB Greg Sullivan: Well, it has been a wild ride. It’s been fun and it’s definitely been challenging. In particular, those first couple of years were tough. You know, even in the best of times, it’s tough for magazines to break out from the crowd and make it economically. But during that time I think it was especially challenging with lots of doubting about print and magazines.

Yet, we’re making money this year. Our circulation has gone up fivefold, and I can’t even tell you just how much our revenue has increased, but yes, it’s been a very gratifying and exciting ride and I’m really pleased.

Samir Husni: What has been the most pleasant surprise during this five year journey?

Greg Sullivan: There have been a couple of pleasant surprises. One was the receptivity that Afar had, just in general. There was certainly some degree of skepticism, but there was also a lot of wow, this is great, how can I help and we love not only the fact that you’re doing it, but we love what you’re doing.

It was a little about what the magazine was doing, of course and that’s the fact that we try and help people have deeper, richer, more authentic travel experiences and it comes through a little that the passion we have is real and people have really rallied to that and said that they love it and want to participate in it. Readers, advertisers and industry people have all been jumping on and have been very supportive and that’s been the most gratifying thing.

Samir Husni: What has been the biggest stumbling block that you’ve had to overcome?

Greg Sullivan: The biggest stumbling block was just breaking through the whole credibility thing. You know it’s back to the question: are you going to make it, or are you just this oddity and are you going to be a real and successful business?

And like I said, even in the best of times, lots of magazines failed. In this environment, people were asking were we really going to make it; so it was getting by those questions of whether we were going to make it or not, I would say, was probably the biggest hurdle.

Samir Husni: I remember at that launch party five years ago and it was almost a consensus that people were giving you six months, maybe three to six issues and you would be out of business. Having said that; you came to this industry with no magazine background, was that an advantage or a disadvantage to you?

Greg Sullivan: Both. If I’d had the experience, in my opinion, I probably wouldn’t have done it. We brought freshness and a competence with a we-can-do-this attitude that showed an outsider’s point of view really helped. But yet, there’s a lot of reality to everyday business and of course we brought in a lot of pros to help us, from our editor to our publisher, people who have a lot of experience and that made up for the lack of experience on my part with their great industry connections and knowledge.

Samir Husni: Did you expect to spend as much money as you did? I remember, and please correct me if I’m mistaken, but I remember you told me that you budgeted something like $20 million to spend on this; is the $20 million gone?

Greg Sullivan: That’s about right. But we’re still in good shape.

Samir Husni: And now five years later, you’ve been in the news again in the last month or so about native advertising and the deals that you’ve made with naming the hotels; do you think that will impact in any way the credibility that you’ve established over this last five years with the magazine?

Greg Sullivan: No, we won’t let it. What we’re doing in the hotels category is we’re recommending great hotels, some of which pay for support. You don’t put this kind of money or this kind of investment without always being very true to the brand. You’re not going to do things just for short-term profit and that’s always been our approach and so we’re not going to do anything that’s going to confuse people in terms of what we’re about and we’re not going to put our name somewhere that we think is going to not be appropriate. So I’m not at all worried about that.

Samir Husni: And you were on a mission; I remember the first time I met you, you were telling me the experiential aspect of travel, where you decide one day to buy a ticket for Buenos Aires, hire a cab once there and have it take you to some hotel without any planning; has experiential travel evolved at all and are you still going on those wild trips or are you planning a bit more?

AF0514_Cover_CMYK-1 Greg Sullivan: Well, even then I told you there are a lot of different ways to do experiential travel. I would do them on trips and I would also do them on what I call deep dives where I would go somewhere and I would study or take art classes; I actually studied philosophy at Cambridge and I took eco trips in Borneo and we took spontaneous trips.

So there’s various ways to get beneath the surface and try to experience the distinctive parts of a place and I guess that I’m still doing that; however I don’t do it as much or for as long before I started the business.

You know fortunately and unfortunately the business has caused a lot of attention for me, but I’m also able to do deep dives so much easier. We have connections all over the world now and Afar gets me through doors that before I couldn’t even get beneath the surface of so quickly by just saying, “Hey, I’m Greg from Afar.”

And I guess the thing to me is experiential travel has become more and more of a thing. When we were first talking about it the consensus was, isn’t that just for backpackers, and now it has just become more and more accepted and part of the vernacular.

When we launched, hotels said we don’t want to talk about what’s going on outside our four walls and now they’re widely accepting of being a part of the local community and helping people have experiences outside of their properties.

And by the way, that goes for all kinds of businesses, not just hotels. Car companies are talking about experiences, so it has become much more of the mainstream in some sense.

Samir Husni: For you, it seems as though you’ve been on a mission, not just to publish a magazine. You had the Foundation idea, where you wanted to take high school kids overseas who had never gone; how has that multiple mission worked?

Greg Sullivan: When we started the magazine in 2009, at the same time we started our non-profit. It’s all the same heart; it’s about travel that makes a difference in people’s lives and that’s what we believe in. And if you really believe in that, you want to get younger people or people who would never be able to afford traveling and take them and you know it will change their lives and their communities.

And we’ve sent over 300 students, basically we’ve been sending 50 or 60 kids every summer from all over to places like Peru, Cambodia, China and Mexico; just amazing trips and these kids are coming back and they have you in tears as they tell you about the effects these trips have on them. And that program is really beginning to take off too as we’re beginning to grow and get our message out.

We just received a donation last week, our biggest donation yet, over $400,000, toward Learning Afar, which will be for another 40 kids. And what we want to do now is not only talk to the students who are making the trip, we’re going to try and start spreading that message by doing assemblies in the schools and getting everybody there to start thinking about travel, even if they don’t get to make these trips. Expanding their horizons and their perspective will broaden the possibilities in their lives.

Samir Husni: I can hear in your voice that sense of satisfaction; do you feel that now you’re on the right track and ten years from now you and I will be talking about the fifteenth anniversary of Afar and the Foundation and the success of the trips?

Greg Sullivan: Absolutely. And you’re right; I do have a passion and a determination in my voice that’s probably the same tone you heard five years ago. What you hear a little bit different now is confidence, a little bit more experience. We’ve reached profitability and we’re on this great path. This is like the 4th business I’ve started and this one is definitely the one I have the most passion for and hopefully it will be the last one I start.

And it’s interesting being an entrepreneur. I always talk to people about having a vision and you also have the reality and keeping those two in sync is always interesting and it can be difficult. Some people are very good at vision and some at reality and it’s hard to find people who can do both and keep them in sync. And that was really hard five years ago.

But today the reality is so much closer to the vision that we have, it’s easier and more and more people get it and it’s more and more believable.

Samir Husni: With the five years of experience in your back pocket and the other three businesses that you’ve started; what advice would you give to a young entrepreneur who came to you with an idea for a new magazine?

Greg Sullivan: Well, it’s not for the faint of heart. First of all, it takes cash. And it takes a lot of work. You need to have both of those and you need to bring in some people to help you. I’ve been very fortunate to attract an amazing team that has really helped to make this all happen.

But I totally believe it’s a great way; I would not have wanted to try and build our company as an all-digital company. I don’t think we would be here today.

It takes a much bigger investment than just trying to start being a blogger on the web or something. Just don’t underestimate the financial and time commitment that it’s going to take would be my best advice.

Samir Husni: One of the points that you mentioned, and I remember when I first met you five years ago, you were focusing on print first, then the web, but you just said you don’t believe you would have been as big of a success as an all-digital entity. What role do you think print still plays today in this digital age?

Greg Sullivan: Print is coming back. Three years ago, people didn’t even like to talk about print and now you’re seeing more and more people going to print again. And they just see the value and the break out from the clutter. It’s also a tactile and a permanent thing. It has credibility and it’s deeper; it just has so many attributes to it that the digital world lacks.

In reach, we’re bigger digitally than we are in print, but that would have never happened without our print component.

Samir Husni: Are you making more money from digital now than print?

Greg Sullivan: The revenues are not bigger, it’s probably a little bit more profitable, but they’re both profitable.

Samir Husni: Can you imagine Afar existing without the print edition?

Greg Sullivan: No.

Samir Husni: And feel free not to answer this question, but have you gotten any money back from your $20 million yet?

Greg Sullivan: Yes.

Samir Husni: And when do you think you’ll break even or recoup that money?

Greg Sullivan: That’s harder to say. That depends so much on what else we get into. You can tell by our approach, we’re introducing new things all the time. There are always new opportunities, so that’s hard to say.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Greg Sullivan: I go back to the vision and the execution thing. What I think about in the middle of the night is execution issues; how are we delivering on all of our promises every day. Which I shouldn’t be worrying about, but that’s a part of me that is a reality. It’s like each of our things are always trying to get executed and I wake up once in a while and ask myself, “Wow! Is that program really delivering what I want it to?”

Maybe not a classic answer, but that’s the honest truth.

Samir Husni: Thank you.
© Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Rights to excerpts and links to the blog are hereby permitted with proper credit. Copying the entire blog is NOT permitted and is a violation of the copyright laws.

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Ellen Levine: The Launch Queen of Successful Magazines. The Mr. Magazine™ Interview with Hearst Magazines’ Editorial Director

June 11, 2014

“I believe that you have to be the reader. You can’t try and force the reader to be you. So you have to give them what they want and understand it emotionally, understand the voice and the need.” Ellen Levine

HCI Being responsible for some really big magazine titles that have been around for a very long time is only one of Ellen Levine’s job duties as the first-ever Editorial Director of Hearst Magazines; she also knows what it means to develop and strengthen the flock. Dr. Oz The Good Life, Food Network Magazine, HGTV Magazine are just a few of her success stories while at Hearst.

If anyone in the magazine industry deserves the title “launch queen,” it is Ellen Levine. And not only launch queen, but successful magazines launch queen. She succeeded where others failed and she continues to do so. Levine is the no non-sense editor who puts her money where her mouth is. In fact, she is the “less-talk” and “more-do” editor. Levine’s mantra for success is becoming the reader, learning to look at each one of her titles through the eyes of her audience and connecting with each individual person in a very human, very empathetic way.

I spoke with Ms. Levine recently about her past and present accomplishments and her secrets of keeping that audience engagement.

So, sit back, relax and enjoy the Mr. Magazine™ conversation with Ellen Levine, Editorial Director, Hearst Magazines.

But first the sound-bites:

On her recipe for audience connectivity: You need to be able to give them what they didn’t know they wanted or needed in a way that’s appealing.

On her secret for keeping her feet firmly planted on the ground: I really don’t know my secret. I like to define myself as a normal reader when I read all the magazines that we do.

On what keeps her up at night: I am usually up at three in the morning, saying, we should have fixed that headline or that cover line.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Ellen Levine, Editorial Director, Hearst Magazines…

Samir Husni: You’ve launched and supervised more successful magazines than probably any female editor that I can think of; what’s your secret recipe for that editorial connectivity with an audience in these changing times? Things have changed so much and yet, from your days at Woman’s Day until the present with Dr. Oz The Good Life, you’re always able to captivate that audience out there.

Ellen Levine: That’s a good question. I believe that you have to be the reader. You can’t try and force the reader to be you. So you have to give them what they want and understand it emotionally, understand the voice and the need. In terms of that, it doesn’t mean you have to have multi-personalities, but you have to be open to what they want. You’re not a teacher, you’re not forcing things. And you need to be able to give them what they didn’t know they wanted or needed in a way that’s appealing.

Everybody wants health information, but they don’t want it the same way. Some want it in an academic voice, some want it in a kind of sillier voice and there is an intimacy that you have to feel. You can’t intellectualize it.

Samir Husni: You also keep your feet on the ground. A lot of editors who have achieved less than you have aren’t so grounded. You see their heads above the clouds; what’s your secret?

Ellen Levine: I don’t know. I’m sorry. I really don’t know my secret. I like to define myself as a normal reader when I read all the magazines that we do. Maybe I have so many different personalities that I should be hospitalized.

But in fact, I can just get into it. And we look to hire staffs that have the same wonderful journalism skills and are very embedded in that fact, but also have understanding and empathy with the reader, none of the holier-than-thou attitudes. You come to us and we will educate you. We want to speak in a different language in each magazine and of course, with somebody like Oz it’s very easy to capture what the energy should be.

On other brands where you’re trying to read the needs of the Food Network person, the best lesson that we ever learned, first of all was to hire brilliant editors like Maile Carpenter, Sara Peterson and now Jill Herzig; you have to understand from that reader exactly how to approach her.

The one other anecdote on Food Network, which is very much of an example, is that we went into focus groups, we did two prototypes and we went into those groups thinking, oh my gosh, what are we going to name this magazine? We liked Spoon, we liked Butter; you know we went through all these names and we’re putting them out there in the focus groups and one of the women said, “I don’t care what you call it, I’m calling it Food Network Magazine.” And there became the name.

Samir Husni: What keeps you up at night?

Ellen Levine: Everything, my children and my husband. But really, toward the closing of every magazine issue, I am usually up at three in the morning, saying, we should have fixed that headline or that cover line.

Samir Husni: Thank you.
© Samir “Mr. Magazine™” Husni, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved.
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Rights to excerpts and links to the blog are hereby permitted with proper credit. Copying the entire blog is NOT permitted and is a violation of the copyright laws.

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