Archive for March, 2008

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Seven Questions and Answers with the 30 Most Notable Launches (4): Eldr and Everywhere

March 31, 2008

Today we present two more 7 questions and answers from our interviews with the editors and publishers of the 30 Most Notable Launches. The interviews will be published based on the alphabetical order of the names of the magazines. Today’s magazines are Eldr and Everywhere. To read a short profile about each of the aforementioned magazines just click on the magazine name. We have asked the editors or publishers to answer the same 7 questions. You can scroll down the blog to read the previous days questions and answers. What follows are today’s two notables:

Chad Lewis of Eldr magazine answered our questions:
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1. What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?

ELDR is challenging the traditional concept of what it means to age … that growing older is about being dependent, passive and sitting in a rocking chair. Today’s elders are adventurous, independent and defining aging on their own terms!

2. What was the biggest pleasant surprise?

We staked out a different point of view and have been very surprised at the overwhelmingly positive response from readers. We expected more dissent.

3. Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?

Getting people to understand that the word “ELDER” co notates respect and wisdom. It is a good thing to be an ELDER.

4. What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?

Convincing advertisers that ELDR readers have the money, time and psychographics that they need to reach and be associated with moving forward. There are over 40 million people in the United States over 60; they have $1.3 trillion in annual spending power, and 13,000 more turn 60 every day.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human? Describe that human being.

This human being is wise, knowledgeable, and has lived a life full of challenging, yet wonderful experiences. The challenging issues of aging has not dampened his or her enthusiasm or desire to be engaged and active. This human being has experienced loss but still has a marvelous sense of humor.

6. The number of new magazines launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you offer to someone wanting to start a magazine?

If you are passionate and knowledgeable about a topic that interests other people you can find readers for your magazine but this is not enough. You need a market that is attractive to advertisers. Then you need resources to connect the advertisers with the readers. And finally, it comes down to execution.

7. Finish this sentence: In 2011, your magazine will be …

The “LIFE” magazine for a whole new generation of aging boomers.

Paul Cloutier of Everywhere magazine answered our questions:
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1. What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?

Finding a way to bring the vitality of the web to the brilliance of print. By asking the people we want to hear from anyway, real people who have authentic experiences, we are seeing places that break free of the trends of all the other travel magazines, and we still get the incredible presentation and experience of a beautifully printed magazine.

2. Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?

Proving that a huge group of passionate amateurs can actually provide photos and stories that are high enough quality to go into a magazine. We knew after starting JPG that we could get more great photos than we could ever use, but Everywhere is a little more complicated in-terms of how many more words there are. But amazingly it turns out we have way more words that we can use as well, and we think that is because we have focused on shorter form writing that we know people on the web can do well: comments, captions, blog posts, and things like that. It turns out these work really well for the kind of magazines we want to make, and it really resonates with our audience.

3. What was the most pleasant surprise?

We started Everywhere with the goal of making a magazine that inspires people to travel and we are surprised every day by the submissions that make us want to go out and travel. We really think it illustrates the promise of this idea that, as editors, we are constantly surprised and exposed to new things by thousands of people in our community.

4. What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?

Reinventing circulation growth. We are developing a new circulation model for a modern magazine, which means looking at the massive shifts in how people interact with media, and how communities organize to share the things they are interested in. Working with the existing distribution industry can be challenging when we are always looking for smarter ways to create sustainable growth for our circulation without falling into the trap of cut-rate subscriptions or over saturated newsstands. The community has a passionate connection to the magazine and we have found that they are more invested in helping grow the magazine than the distributors are.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human? Describe that human being.

Everywhere is that person who always has great stories at dinner parties about the great places of the world. He isn’t a snob about it and has a very inviting way of telling people about interesting experiences. For this person, travel is more than something you do once a year, travel is a way of life. It is something that they do everyday, in their own town, or across the world, they take every opportunity to enjoy the world and find new experiences.

6. The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you offer to someone wanting to start a new magazine?

A good magazine is a community – At their hearts, all magazines are basically artifacts of the interests of their readers. Good magazines embrace this and recognize that those readers aren’t just silent, passive consumers of content. Any magazine can benefit from the expertise of its readers. Which is not to say that all magazines need to be completely community created, but the opportunity is to find ways to break down some of the walls between editors and readers.

Don’t forget that there is an internet – Most magazines were launched before the web existed and most that have launched since then still tend to act like it doesn’t exist. Look at what your people are doing online before you launch a print magazine. What parts of their behavior and interest are being under-served by the web, is there something that print could do better? Good print magazines are going to be hybrids that let the web do what it is good at and let print do
what it is good at rather than treating them like competitors. Start the process asking how the web can make your magazine better.


Beware of “The Right Way to Do Things” – Magazines have been made the same basic way for a long time, and many of the problems that they are currently faced with are caused by resisting change, and not recognizing that parts of the model are broken. If your only reason for doing something is because that is the way things are done, then you should consider if things have changed since that rule was made. Some of the smartest people in publishing right now are people who have come from outside of the publishing world.

7. Finish this sentence: in 2011 your magazine will be…

The magazine industry is in such incredible flux right now that any real prediction that far out is purely fantasy, however our goal is for Everywhere to continue it’s growth and become the best travel magazine for inspiring people to get up and go. We are thinking quite a lot about how important participatory advertising is to us as well as how the newsstand market is changing. We will continue to focus on how we can create a great environment for people to share the stories
and photos of the places they have been, and to give those people the power to make the magazine they want to read.

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Seven Questions and Answers with the 30 Most Notable Launches (3): Bond and Condé Nast Portfolio

March 27, 2008

Today we present two more 7 questions and answers from our interviews with the editors and publishers of the 30 Most Notable Launches. The interviews will be published based on the alphabetical order of the names of the magazines. Today’s magazines are Bond and Condé Nast Portfolio. To read a short profile about each of the aforementioned magazines just click on the magazine name. We have asked the editors or publishers to answer the same 7 questions. Click here to read part one, here to read part two and here to read our interview with Tyler Brule of Monocle magazine, our first international notable launch of the year. What follows are today’s two notables:

Lynn Tsutsumi of Bond magazine answered our questions…
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1. What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?

Bond has succeeded in crossing all borders to be the first “exclusively inclusive” wedding magazine on the market to date. Bond appeals to the hip, urban, modern couple, both gay and straight and of all ethnicities. Bond encourages couples to think outside of the very narrow wedding box and to plan their ceremony and reception as an expression of their lifestyle.

2. Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?

The concept of Bond was very new and difficult for people to visualize prior to its launch. Most people have a very traditional view of what weddings are supposed to be like and Bond was breaking the mold. We had to put out a complete magazine with our Issue Zero just to show how it could be done.

3. What was the most pleasant surprise?

The most pleasant surprise was the acceptance and embracement of the Bond concept from all over the world. We get comments daily from people from all walks of life saying, “It’s about time!” There has been absolutely no controversy about representing gay and straight weddings together. We feel like we are on the right track and our audience has been waiting for Bond.

4. What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?

Bond’s biggest challenge right now is letting the world it exists without a big marketing department.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human? Describe that human being.

Bond in human form is intelligent, beautiful, multi-cultural and passionate. It is a unifier, not a divider. It is global, forthright and pioneering: a gay Barack Obama.

6. The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you offer to someone wanting to start a new magazine?

Make sure to have someone with a business background on your team.

7. Finish this sentence: in 2011 your magazine will be…

In 2011 Bond and bondmag.net will be the ultimate resource and visual guide for modern weddings around the world. Bond will be the standard for non-traditional weddings.

David Carey of Condé Nast Portfolio answered our questions:

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1. What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?


Portfolio has energized a sector of the publishing business that many had thought was moribund. By introducing a print magazine that made sense in the context of how people consume information these days, we’ve been able to deliver a new experience for readers. Building both the magazine and website simultaneously, we were able to demonstrate that “new media” can be print as well as digital.

2. Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?


While the launch was intensely covered by the media, we were pleasantly surprised how quickly this new media brand was included in the small collection of mainstream business media. Just a few months into its existence, CNP quickly joined a short list of publications founded a long time ago. Add cultural reference pints like a quote on “Meet the Press” and we felt we weren’t just the new kid on the block, but part of the club.

3. What was the biggest pleasant surprise?


Given how fast business moves, some people at first couldn’t understand how a monthly magazine would work. But by collecting a diverse portfolio of stories each month, we’ve been able to demonstrate that deeply reported narrative journalism with big picture perspective has the ability to put today’s and tomorrow’s headlines into context.

4. What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?


While we did little to generate it, we benefited from a tremendous amount of media attention as one of the most high profile new launches in years. And that has helped us build great momentum with both advertisers and readers. Maintaining that excitement as the magazine matures and establishing the unique benefits of the product in the marketplace will be our biggest challenge in the coming year.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it
human? Describe that human being.


The embodiment of CNP would be a forward-thinking entrepreneur. The type of executive who might build a great brand from the ground up, take it public and then start all over in an entirely different industry. A man or woman who enjoys the intellectual challenge of business and who also savors the game of it.

6. The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you have to someone wanting to start a new magazine?

Do your homework and stay close to both your readers and advertisers. When we set out to develop CNP, we had a clear idea of the opportunity. But we invited both potential advertising partners and readers into the process. Intensive focus groups and research both pre-publication and between our first two issues yielded vital feedback that proved integral in shaping the product you see today.

7. Finish this sentence: In 2011 your magazine will be…


Continuing to explore the business stories of today. By then the technology may have evolved a bit since our launch and some yet-to-be-formulated brands may be shaping the economic conversation, but CNP will be delving deeply into the people and phenomena driving business.

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Seven Questions and Answers with the 30 Most Notable Launches (2): Aromatherapy Thymes and Artful Blogging

March 26, 2008

Today we present two more 7 questions and answers from our interviews with the editors and publishers of the 30 Most Notable Launches. The interviews will be published based on the alphabetical order of the names of the magazines. Today’s magazines are Aromatherapy Thymes and Artful Blogging. To read a short profile about each of the aforementioned magazines just click on the magazine name. We have asked the editors or publishers to answer the same 7 questions. Click here to read part one and here to read our interview with Tyler Brule of Monocle magazine, our first international notable launch of the year. What follows are today’s two notables:

Patricia Carol Brooks of Aromatherapy Thymes answered our questions:

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1. What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?
Our goal of taking an alternative health magazine and making it mainstream and commercial which is atypical for an alternative health magazine that usually has a niche market.

2. Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?
Surprisingly, we were able to assemble, research and collect informative articles of interest, but finding quality photographs and photographers to match the articles was an initial hurdle. Because the intent was to present the science and show the true beauty and art of aromatherapy.

3. What was the most pleasant surprise?
That so many people were interested in aromatherapy and enthusiastic that we presented aromatherapy in a down-to-earth and artistic style.

4. What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?
The two biggest challenges are, maintaining the integrity of the essential oil trade through informative articles and staying in contact with essential oil distillers in the U.S and abroad and coordinating the distribution channels for our market.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human? Describe that human being.
Humble, compassionate, artistic like Degas, and poetic like Henry David Thoreau.

6. The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you offer to someone wanting to start a new magazine?
Do your homework by learning the publishing industry and most important find your readers and do you best to give them a publication no one else can and listen to them.

7. Finish this sentence: in 2011 your magazine will be…
Recognized worldwide as a reliable reference for aromatherapy and a publication that brought the distilling, trade, sell and distribution of essential oils to forefront.

Staci Dumoski of Artful Blogging answered our questions:

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1. What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?

Artful Blogging has breached the barrier between the print and online worlds. There’s a lot of talk about the decline of print as people turn to electronic means for news and entertainment, but we’ve turned that digital awareness to our advantage by offering contributors and readers something concrete that they can hold on to, kind of a “best of the best” of what they might find online. It lends a sense of permanence to the ephemeral virtual world. I hope it makes people realize it doesn’t have to be one or the other — print and digital media can help each other grow.

2. Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?

Simply conveying to contributors, distributors and buyers what we are trying to accomplish, and getting them to believe that people really would spend money for content they’d already seen online.

3. What was the most pleasant surprise?

How beautiful the magazine is to look out. With dozens of artists representing all different art forms, it had the potential to be a real visual hodge-podge. But instead it’s turned out to be something of a visual masterpiece! That, and the response of our readers, who were buzzing about it on their blogs before it even hit the stands.

4. What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?

The Internet is always changing, and we have to stay responsive to that change by adapting to what’s going on in the online community. We don’t want to bore our readers by getting stuck in a rut.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human? Describe that human being.

Exactly the kind of person you’d like to have over for tea and conversation. Or rather, a whole room full of those people — kind, colorful, generous, and inspiring.

6. The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you offer to someone wanting to start a new magazine?

Don’t underestimate the importance of your visual impact. As enamored as I personally am of the inspirational stories our contributors tell, our #1 reader response is always about how gorgeous the publication is.

7. Finish this sentence: in 2011 your magazine will be…

…a completely different creature than it is now. More than that, I can’t say, because who knows what the Internet will look like five years from now? For sure we’ll be right there on the edge, helping all our artful readers keep track of the digital realm.

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Seven Questions and Answers with the 30 Most Notable Launches (1): 0 – 60, American Driver and Antenna

March 25, 2008

Starting today and for the next ten days we will be publishing our interviews with the editors and publishers of the 30 Most Notable Launches. The interviews will be published based on the alphabetical order of the names of the magazines. Today’s magazines are 0-60, American Driver and Antenna. To read a short profile about each of the aforementioned magazines just click on the magazine name. We have asked the editors or publishers to answer the same 7 questions. Yesterday we’ve published our first one with Tyler Brule of Monocle, our first ever International Notable Launch of the Year. Here are the first three of the American magazines.

Brian Scotto of 0 – 60 magazine answered our questions:

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1. What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?

The concept for 0-60 was to redefine the American car magazine, but actually translating the ideas we had in our head to the page was the difficult part. 0-60 is the magazine we wanted to read, something that fills the void between the mainstream and enthusiast titles and focuses on stories that take a different approach, where the writing, photography and design all play an equal role. That said, our greatest accomplishment has been finding a publisher, editorial team and art department who were all wiling to take the risk and challenge each other to make 0-60 what it is.

2. Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?

With an audience that is captivated by the immediacy of the Internet, we needed to create a modern print magazine that complemented the material found on the Web instead of trying to compete with it. 0-60 needed to be a print evolution. Quite simply, we just had to do it better than everyone else. We’ve spent weeks working on just one page.

3. What was the most pleasant surprise?

Rarely can you make everyone happy, but we’ve received glowing responses from automakers, advertisers and readers alike. Usually, to please one you must upset the other. Readers constantly tell us that 0-60 fits them perfectly, and obviously reaching that target audience delights the advertisers and automakers, too.

4. What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?

The automotive publishing world is cluttered; however, 0-60’s unique mission has allowed us to overcome this and stand out to the industry, plus convince new readers who have become disenchanted by the current crop of car mags to come back to the newsstand.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human. Describe that human being.

It’s my best friend; the guy I talk cars with. He shares my passion, my interests and my style. He gets it.

6. The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you offer to someone wanting to start a new magazine?

Prepare for a struggle—there’s no room left in the print world for half measures and “me too magazines.” Your product must be clearly differentiated from the others sharing shelf space. But while hard work and sleepless nights should be rewarded, you also need to have an excellent relationship with distributors, wholesalers and retailers. At the end of the day, magazines need to sell.

7. Finish this sentence: In 2011 your magazine will be…

…ranked amongst the big “buff” books like Car and Driver, Motor Trend and Road & Track, but still be as unique and progressive as it is today.

Timothy Miller of American Driver magazine answered our questions:

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1) What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?

“American Driver” being mentioned first and in the same sentence with “Robb Report,” “Cigar Aficionado,” and “Automobile” magazines by an advertising media buyer.

2) Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?

All the “no,” “not interested” and “that’ll never work” comments.

3) What was the biggest surprise?

The warm handshakes and bright smiles from the car owners, car collectors and automotive enthusiasts we meet from around the country and the eagerness with which they open up their homes, garages and businesses to our staff and readers.

4) What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?

Building and increasing the advertising, marketing and promotional value for our advertisers in creative, ground-breaking and measurable ways while also incorporating new, innovative ideas into our editorial mix.

5) Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human? Describe that human being.

That human being would be Jay Leno – an affable, successful, entertaining and intelligent car nut.

6) The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you offer to someone wanting to start a new magazine?

Step One: Read as many magazines as you can in your neighborhood bookstore. Buy your top five favorites and determine your motivation for those purchases.
Step Two: Purchase and read Samir’s “Guide to New Magazines.”
Step Three: Read Samir’s “Guide to New Magazines” five more times and then donate it to a college.
Step Four: Beg and borrow $2 to $6 million and call me in the morning.

7) Finish this sentence: In 2011, your magazine will be…

In 2011, “American Driver” will be the brand most requested, recognized and welcomed by those influential automotive enthusiasts enjoying the luxury lifestyle.

Dennis Page of Antenna magazine answered our questions:

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1. What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?

Creating a magazine that is “art” in itself.

2. Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?

Photographing the entire magazine with original photography (no stock, no pickup,
no jpegs).

3. What was the biggest pleasant surprise?

Women’s Wear Daily gave us an out-of-the box glowing review, as though it was a Conde Nast launch.

4. What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?

Trying to get the respect from high level advertisers that only Conde Nast can command.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human?
Describe that human being.

It’s a collabo of James Bond from Undefeated and Holden Caufield from “The Catcher in the Rye”.

6. The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do
you offer to someone wanting to start a new magazine?

Make sure there is a real audience. Don’t create a magazine just for advertisers.

7. Finish this sentence: In 2011, your magazine will be….

…..a brand marketing “think tank.”

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The Art of TV Guide Making a Cover-Story from a Non-Story

March 24, 2008

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Every Monday I receive by subscription edition of TV Guide, two days before it hits the newsstands. Well, last week I received my copy with a very steamy cover picture and cover lines that screams as much as the picture: “How Far Can TV Go? Is it just us…or is sex on TV steamier than ever?” My first reaction was Wow! Quite a bold move on behalf of TV Guide. Well, when I paid my Wed. visit to the newsstands I saw a completely different cover of TV Guide. Mind you that is not the first time TV Guide offers different newsstands and subscription covers. Just two weeks ago the subscribers received the political cover while the newsstands received the red carpet cover. What amazed me this time is the newsstands’ cover story on Britney Spears was not even mentioned in the subscription edition table of contents. It was item number 5 on a list of 10 Breaking News Top Stories list. Well miracles happen and the editors were able to turn the ten-lines story in the subscribers’ copies to a full two-page story in the newsstands’ copies. More pull out quotes, bigger type and a change in the table of contents announcing the story of Britney’s comeback as the cover story. The bold picture from The Tudors’ ended up on the side cropped and less sexy, much less sexy.
I read the story of the major Britney’s comeback in the two-page version and compared it to the ten-lines story. Guess what? Nothing earth shaking or different. Both stories told the same story of Britney’s comeback playing a one time guest stint of “Abby, a nerdy receptionist who falls for Ted (How I Met Your Mother”…” The episode airs tonight on CBS. Britney may have hit a “major” comeback, but I believe with this stunt TV Guide has hit a major low in the attempt of creating cover stories from non stories. It is hard to believe that the Britney Spears and Josh Radnor cover would sell more than the sexy revealing cover of Jonathan Rhys Meyers and Natalie Dorme.
In fact that is the first time that I can recall where a magazine used their “sex” cover for subscribers and their “timid, no sex” cover for single copy sales. The example below of the traditional way of doing the sex covers is from the April edition of Redbook. The sex cover is the newsstands’ edition, the non-sex cover is for subscribers. Interested in knowing the reasons for that? Check Redbook’s editor-in-chief Stacy Morrison’s response to me regarding the sex no sex cover decision making issues by clicking here.
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Monocle: Mr. Magazine’s™ Notable International Launch of the Year + An interview with Tyler Brule

March 24, 2008

monoclefemale.jpgIf you were told in March 2007 that there is a brand new magazine with a hefty cover price, ads from Gucci, malo, Cartier, PRADA, Audi and Boss to name a few, and no celebrities on the cover or inside, yes no celebrities but rather lengthy in-depth articles about serious issues, great photography and is mainly printed on matte paper with a Manga magazine insert, your answer would have been, “What have you been drinking?” Well, Tyler Brule was probably drinking that Clear Canadian water at the home of his aunt Anita in Toronto 33 years ago. He is the editor-in-chief and chairman of Monocle the magazine that defines itself as “A briefing on global affairs, business, culture & design.” Brule who started Wallpaper* magazine in 1996 in the UK, two years after he arrived there from Canada, outlined the vision, mission and unique selling features of Monocle in its first issue. Monocle will be “A smart, forward looking, single edition global briefing for a highly mobile, international audience,” Brule wrote.
His 10 points outline of the business plan of the magazine was also published in that March 2007 issue. Brule and his team decided the magazine should:

1. Be a complete media brand with print, web and broadcast components
2. Deliver across all these areas in new formats
3. Focus on global affairs, business, culture, design and the best products/services on the market
4. Be an oasis from celebrities and low production values
5. Champion fresh talent for both words and pictures
6. Look ahead, not chase the ambulance
7. Accept no freebies
8. Likewise, not be given away for free
9. Open bureaux, so we have our own people on the ground
10. Do our bit to raise the bar

monocle1.jpgA year later Monocle has been slowly but surely delivering on its 10 points promise and delivering well. While newspapers are closing overseas offices and trimming staff, Monocle is adding offices and expanding its staff on the different continents of the world. Brule continues to show the world that, on one hand, print is well, alive and kicking and on the other hand innovation in print is needed more today than ever. Monocle earned our first ever title of International Notable Launch of the Year. We asked Tyler Brule seven questions (the same questions we will be asking all the 30 notable launches of 2007). What follows are the Qs and As with Brule via e-mail:

1.What do you consider the single most important achievement your magazine has accomplished in today’s marketplace?

IT’S TRICKY TO SINGLE OUT JUST ONE BREAKTHROUGH. WE’VE DEMONSTRATED THAT FORMAT (TRIM SIZE, PAPER STOCK) IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER IN A DIGITAL AGE. AT THE SAME TIME WE’VE CHALLENGED THE SUBSCRIPTION MODEL AND CONVINCED READERS TO PAY MORE FOR QUALITY – MONOCLE’S SUBSCRIPTION IS 50% HIGHER THAN ITS COVER PRICE.

2.Looking back, what was the most important hurdle you were able to overcome?

CONVINCING LUXURY GOODS ADVERTISERS TO LOVE MATTE PAPER RATHER THAN GLOSS.

3.What was the most pleasant surprise?

THAT GERMANY BECAME OUR THIRD BIGGEST MARKET.

4.What is the biggest challenge you are facing today?

MANAGING NEWSSTANDS IN OVER 40 KEY MARKETS.

5. Imagine you have a magic wand and you can strike the magazine and make it human? Describe that human being.

MONOCLE WOULD BE THAT RARE PERSON YOU END UP SITTING NEXT TO ON A LONG HAUL FLIGHT WHO’S SO INFORMED, WITTY, HANDSOME AND CHARMING THAT YOU NEVER WANT THE FLIGHT TO END.

6. The number of new magazine launches has been on a steady increase. What advice do you offer to someone wanting to start a new magazine?

DO A VERY CONSERVATIVE BUSINESS PLAN AND THEN ADD 50% WHEN YOU LOOK FOR YOUR FUNDING.

7. Finish this sentence: in 2011 your magazine will be…

AN ADJECTIVE FOR QUALITY.

Congratulations to Tyler Brule and the team at Monocle from the entire staff at MrMagazine™. We will be publishing the answers to our seven questions with the 30 most notable launches of 2007 starting tomorrow and for the next two weeks. On April 5 we will announce our Most Notable Launch of Year in the United State from the list of the 30 notable launches. Stay tuned.

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The 30 Most Notable Launches of 2007 Plus One …

March 20, 2008

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Once a year my staff and I select the 30 most notable launches of the previous year. The selections have been made and you can view and read about the 30 most notable launches here. This year we are adding one extra magazine to the 30 notables and it will be our International Launch of the Year. On Monday March 24 we will announce the name of the magazine and we will publish a brief Q and A with its founder. Every day after that we will publish on this blog two or three Qs and As with the publishers or editors of the 30 most notable launches. In two weeks we will select the top five most notable launches of 2007 and on April 5 we will release our selection of the most notable launch of the year from the 30 that we’ve selected. For now enjoy the 30 most notable launches and tell us your choice from those 30 which one you feel deserves the title most notable launch of 2007.

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